SENSORY AND NUTRITIONAL EVALUATION OF COOKIES DEVELOPED USING CRUDE PALM OIL, SAFFLOWER OIL AND THEIR BLENDS

Article Id: ARCC2206 | Page : 14-19
Citation :- SENSORY AND NUTRITIONAL EVALUATION OF COOKIES DEVELOPED USING CRUDE PALM OIL, SAFFLOWER OIL AND THEIR BLENDS.Asian Journal Of Dairy and Food Research.2009.(28):14-19
Ritu Panghal, Sudesh Jood* and Neelam Khetarpaul
Address : Department of Foods and Nutrition, CCC Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125004, India

Abstract

Crude palm oil which can serve as a potent source of b-carotene and total carotenoids and
monounsaturated fatty acids mainly oleic acid. Considering the nutritive value of crude palm
oil (CPO), this study was directed towards blending of CPO with other commonly used cooking
vegetable oils to attain ideal fatty acid composition of SFA : MUFA : PUFA (1:2:1). Palm oil was
blended with safflower oil in two proportions i.e., CPO : safflower oil (65:35) and CPO : safflower
oil (70:30). The fatty acid composition of different oils revealed that palmitic acid was
predominant fatty acid (43.45 %) in CPO followed by oleic (40.98 %) and linoleic acid (14.67
%). However, safflower oil contained maximum amount of linoleic acid (73.61 %) followed by
oleic (18.23 %), palmitic (6.27 %) and stearic acid (1.87 %), respectively. Cookies were prepared
using individual oils and their blends were found organoleptically acceptable. b-carotene and
total carotenoids of different types of cookies ranged from 0 to 8179.07 and 0 to 11589.30 mg/
100g, respectively. Storage studies also indicated that cookies could be stored up to 1 month
without any adverse effect on sensory evaluation

Keywords

Nutritional evaluation Cookies Palm oil Safflower oil Blends.

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