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NUTRIENT COMPOSITION OF DRUMSTICK (MORINGA OLEIFERA) POD POWDER AND THEIR PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

Article Id: ARCC1032 | Page : 285 - 289
Citation :- NUTRIENT COMPOSITION OF DRUMSTICK (MORINGA OLEIFERA) POD POWDER AND THEIR PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT.Asian Journal of Dairy and Food Research.2011.(30):285 - 289
Priyanka Joshi* and Shashi Jain1 priyanka_fn@yahoo.co.in
Address : Plant Biotechnology Centre, S. K. Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner-334 001, India

Abstract

Drumstick (Moringa oleifera) pod powder was analyzed for proximate composition, ascorbic acid and mineral content and evaluated for their potential to develop biscuits and mathri. Results showed that 100g drumstick pod powder had protein 10.18 g, fat 5.43 g, ash 5.09 g, fibre 4.85 g, carbohydrate 74.46 g, energy 387 kcal, ascorbic acid 292 mg, calcium 6.66 mg, iron 31.50 mg, sodium 202.98 mg, potassium 1772 mg, zinc 1.25 mg, copper 1.07 mg and manganese 3.99 mg. Acceptability of products was assessed on 9 point hedonic scale by a group of 10 panel members. Scores of drumstick biscuit and mathri were graded between 7 and 8 respectively indicating that both products were highly acceptable by the panel members. Products developed from drumstick pod powder were  rich in energy and micronutrients and could be easily prepared at household level and adopted for small scale entrepreneurship to generate income.

Keywords

Moringa oleifera Proximate composition Acceptability Food products Biscuit Mathri Drumstick.

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