DEHYDRATION PROCESS OPTIMIZATION FOR MAXIMUM LYCOPENE RETENTION IN TOMATO SLICES USING RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY

DOI: 10.5958/0976-0563.2014.00603.4    | Article Id: DR-877 | Page : 204-208
Citation :- DEHYDRATION PROCESS OPTIMIZATION FOR MAXIMUM LYCOPENE RETENTION IN TOMATO SLICES USING RESPONSE SURFACE METHODOLOGY.Asian Journal Of Dairy and Food Research.2014.(33):204-208
Sandeep Janghu*, Aradhita Ray, Vikas Bansal1 and Ravinder Kaushik janghu_sandeep@rediffmail.com
Address : Department of Food Technology, G.J.U.S. & T., Hisar-125 001, India

Abstract

An investigation was carried out to optimize the time, temperature and slice thickness for dehydration of tomato slices in vacuum oven so that the lycopene losses were minimized. The optimization was done using Box-Behnken method of design expert (R.S.M.), keeping other nutritional factors of tomato slices within range. Optimum conditions for vacuum drying were 2 hrs treatment time at at 80°C temperature and 7 mm slice thickness. The dehydrated product was found with 8.52 mg/100g lycopene which was close to the original value of lycopene found in raw tomatoes.

Keywords

Dehydration Lycopene Process optimization R.S.M. Tomato slices Vacuum oven.

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