EFFICACY OF NUTRITION COUNSELLING ON THE ANTHROPOMETRIC PROFILE OF URBAN WORKING WOMEN

Article Id: ARCC5369 | Page : 221 - 225
Citation :- EFFICACY OF NUTRITION COUNSELLING ON THE ANTHROPOMETRIC PROFILE OF URBAN WORKING WOMEN.Asian Journal Of Dairy and Food Research.2005.(24):221 - 225
Shaveta Monga, Rajbir Sachdeva and Anita Kochhar
Address : Department of Food and Nutrition, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana - 141 004, India

Abstract

Seventy working women (35–45 yrs) belonging to middle income group were selected randomly and divided equally into two groups viz., Experimental (E) and Control (C). Nutrition counselling (NC) was carried in Group E for a period of 3 months. The average per capita income was Rs. 2517±121.5 and Rs. 2243±109.2 in Group E and C respectively. The daily intake of cereals, pulses, GLV's, roots and tubers, other vegetables and fruits was inadequate. However, the average daily intake of milk and milk products, fats and oils, sugar and jaggery exceeded the RDA's in both the groups at T1 (before) and T2 (after nutrition counselling). The anthropometric data revealed that the average weight of the subjects was 64.88±1.23 and 65.03±1.40 kg and 62.80±1.19 and 65.20±1.39 kg at T1 and T2 in Group E and C respectively. Further, all the subjects had lower height, higher weight, marginally higher BMI values, TSFT and MUAC values at T1 and T2. However, the decrease in the above anthropometric parameters at T2 in Group E proved the positive impact of nutrition counselling. As economic empowennent of women might help in improving their nutritional status, but it cannot work alone. So, there is need to educate and create awareness among women about right choice of food and nutrient requirements etc. so that they can attain maximum health potential in their lives.

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