SOCIOECONOMIC CONDITIONS, DIET AND NUTRIENT INTAKE OF LACTATING MOTHERS RESIDING IN URBAN SLUMSOFNAGPUR CITY

Article Id: ARCC5351 | Page : 130 - 136
Citation :- SOCIOECONOMIC CONDITIONS, DIET AND NUTRIENT INTAKE OF LACTATING MOTHERS RESIDING IN URBAN SLUMSOFNAGPUR CITY.Asian Journal Of Dairy and Food Research.2005.(24):130 - 136
Archana Mathew, Rekha Sharma and Sabiha Vali
Address : Post Graduate Teaching Department of Home Science. Nagpur University. Nagpur

Abstract

The socioeconomic conditions, diet and nutrient intake of 497 lactating mothers residing in urban slums of Nagpur city was assessed. The average age of the lactating mothers was 24.11±3.35 years and majority (84.7%) got married between 15 to 20 years. 76.6 per cent mothers had nuclear family and the average family size was 6.02±1.34. About 25 per cent mothers and 21.1 per cent husbands were illiterate. The average monthly family income was Rs. 2486±1811.07. Only 46 mothers were working outside home as domestic servants in nearby locality. These mothers were contributing 24.48 per cent to their family income. For majority of mothers the period of lactational ammenorrhoea was six months. Most of the families were non-vegetarian and had two meal pattern. Results of the diet survey showed that the percent adequacy of only cereals and other vegetables was 72 per cent and 78 per cent respectively. For rest of the food stuffs the percent adequacy was found to be below 42 to 45 per cent. Except thiamine the diet was found to be deficient in all the nutrient. Calories and protein intake was found to be 59.8 and 64.3 per cent respectively. According to Body Mass Index 56.28 per cent mothers were found to be normal where as 42.68 per cent mothers were undernourished. A negative correlation (r = -0.22) was observed between the duration of lactational ammenorrhaea and body mass index of mothers.

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