NUTRITIONAL COMPOSITION OF WINGED BEAN, PSOPHOCARPUS TETRAGONOLOBUS (L) DeCANDOLE

Article Id: ARCC5325 | Page : 11 - 15
Citation :- NUTRITIONAL COMPOSITION OF WINGED BEAN, PSOPHOCARPUS TETRAGONOLOBUS (L) DeCANDOLE.Asian Journal Of Dairy and Food Research.2005.(24):11 - 15
Leena Bhattacharya and Mukta Arora
Address : Department of Foods and Nutrition, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar - 263 145, Uttaranchal, India

Abstract

Eighteen varieties of Winged bean, Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L) OeCandole seeds were evaluated for proximate composition. The range of proximate principles of these test varieties were as follows: moisture, 8.5 to 10.1 per cent; ash, 3.4 to 4.8 per cent; fibre, 10.8 to 12.9 per cent; protein, 33.4 to 39.7 per cent; fat, 16.5 to 20.6 per cent; carbohydrates, 25.1 to 33.1 per cent and energy value, 417.5 to 440.7 Kcal on dry weight basis. It was possible to group these varieties into eight clusters, based on nutritional characteristic of seeds, by using Mahalanobis D2 statistics and canonical variate analysis. It was also observed that protein and fat contributed maximum in creating diversity among these varieties.

Keywords

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