NUTRIENT CONTENTS IN SELECTED MAHARASHTRIAN AND SOUTH INDIAN SINGLE FULL MEALS

Article Id: ARCC2629 | Page : 53 - 64
Citation :- NUTRIENT CONTENTS IN SELECTED MAHARASHTRIAN AND SOUTH INDIAN SINGLE FULL MEALS.Asian Journal Of Dairy and Food Research.2008.(27):53 - 64
Prajakta Nande, Shilpa Harode, Mriduladevi Valle and Sabiha A. Vali
Address : Post Graduate Teaching Department of Home-Science, Rashtrasant Tukadoji Maharaj Nagpur University, Jyotiba Phule Campus, Amravati Road- 440 010. Nagpur, India

Abstract

The present study was conducted to estimate the nutritional quality of selected standard Maharashtrian [M] and South Indian [S] single full meals approximately designed for an average adult. For this purpose, two single full meals [separately from M and S cuisine] varying in compositions were selected. Diets [D] were taken in cooked [C] forms. Meals were coded as M-D1C, M-D2C, S-D1C, and S-D2C. Estimations for protein, fat, crude fiber and ascorbic acid were carried out. Mineral ash was used for estimations of iron and calcium. All meals were found to be good in their protein contents [protein ranged between 14.0 – 24.4 g per meal]. Fat contents in S diets were estimated to be high [15.52 g – 35.50 g]. This could be attributed to excess amount of oil used during cooking. Being rice based, crude fiber contents in S meals were found to be poor [4.57 g to 6.90 g] whereas these were found to be fair in M meals [6.60 – 7.74 g]. The cooked M diets also showed a fairly high calcium content (532.36 mg and 653.19 mg in M-D1C and M-D2C, respectively). Calcium contents in S meals were found to be 340.68 mg in S-D1C and 259.9 mg in S-D2C, respectively. South Indian diets were found to be iron deficient (1.49 mg to 1.96 mg). Maharashtrian meals showed fair amount of iron contents [M- D1C-17.09 mg and M- D2C-17.40 mg]. Ascorbic acid contents in South Indian meals were found to be higher than that in Maharashtrian meals [47.22 and 46.67 mg, respectively in S-D1C and S-D2C]. Calculated values indicate that S meals were high in carbohydrate contents as compared to M meals.

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