EFFECT OF SUBSTRATES ON NUTRIENT COMPOSITION OF OYSTER MUSHROOM (PLEUROTUS SAJOR CAJU)

Article Id: ARCC2233 | Page : 132-136
Citation :- EFFECT OF SUBSTRATES ON NUTRIENT COMPOSITION OF OYSTER MUSHROOM (PLEUROTUS SAJOR CAJU).Asian Journal Of Dairy and Food Research.2009.(28):132-136
Vimla Dunkwal and Sudesh Jood*
Address : Department of Foods and Nutrition, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar-125 004, India

Abstract

In the present study oyster mushroom cultivated on two substrates like wheat straw and
brassica straw was used for evaluating their nutrient compositions. Moisture content of both
types of mushroom was 89.68 and 88.98% on fresh weight basis which differed non-significantly.
Similarly, non-significant difference was also observed in crude fibre, crude fat, ash and energy
contents, whereas significant difference was noticed in crude protein (25.30 and 26.99%) and
total carbohydrates (52.34 and 50.52%). Both types of mushroom exhibited good amount of
vitamins, amino acids and dietary fibre. The values were reported for thiamine (1.18 and 1.13
mg/100 g), riboflavin (3.89 and 3.52 mg/100 g), lysine 6.00 and 6.25 g/100 g protein) and
methionine (1.80 and 1.75 mg mg/100 g) on dry matter basis of wheat and brassica straw grown
mushroom, respectively. Total, soluble and insoluble dietary fibre varied between 15.60 and
13.73, 1.63 and 1.58 and 13.97 and 12.15 g/100 g, respectively. Brassica straw grown oyster
mushroom exhibited significantly higher contents of protein, riboflavin, lysine and methionine
whereas wheat straw grown mushroom contained significantly higher contents of thiamine and
dietary fibre. The variations in nutrient composition of oyster mushroom are likely to be due to
variation in substrate composition.

Keywords

Oyster mushroom Proximate composition Vitamins Amino acids Dietary fibre.

References

  1. Aletor, V.A. (1995). Food Chem. 54:265-268.
  2. AOAC. (1995). Official Methods of Analysis of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists, Association of Analytical
  3. Chemists, Washington DC. pp.125-139.
  4. Bajaj, M., et al. (1996). Mushroom Res. 5:101-104.
  5. Bano, Z., et al. (1992). Indian Food Pack. 46:20-31.
  6. Cerning, J. and Guilbot, J. (1973). Cereal Chem. 50:220-224.
  7. Chandra, S. and Samsher. (2006). J. Food Sci. Technol. 43:221-227.
  8. Cheung, P.C.K. (1997). Food Chem. 60:61-65.
  9. Ekanem, E.O. and Ubengama, V.S. (2002). J. Food Sci. Technol. 36:81-83.
  10. Furda, I. (1981). In: Analysis of Dietary Fibre in Food. (James W.P.T. and Theander O. Eds.), Marcel Dekker, Inc., New
  11. York. pp 163-172.
  12. Goyal, R. (2002). Ph.D. Thesis, CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Hisar, India.
  13. Gupta, M., et al. (2004). J. Food Sci. Technol. 41:584-586.
  14. Krishan, G. and Ranjan, S.K. (1980). Laboratory Manual for Nutrition Research. Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd., New
  15. Delhi. pp. 30-38.
  16. Miyahara, S. and Jikoo, K. (1967). J. Jap. Soc. Food Sci. Technol. 14:512-513.
  17. 136 J. DAIRYING, FOODS & H.S.
  18. Panse, V.G. and Sukhatme, P.V. (1969). Statistical Methods of Agricultural Workers. 2nd Edn., Indian Council of Agricultural
  19. Research, New Delhi. pp12-87.
  20. Raghunathan, R., et al. (1996). Food Chem. 55:139-144.
  21. Rai, R.D. (1995). In : Advances in Horticlture- Mushroom, (Chadha, K.L. and Sharma, S.R. eds.) pp 537-551.
  22. Singh, S., et al. (1995). Indian Food Ind. 14:38-47.
  23. Somogyi, M. (1945). J. Biol. Chem. 160:61-62.
  24. Tshinyangu, K.K. (1996). Die Nahrung. 40:79-83.
  25. Wahid, M., et al. (1990). Mushroom J. Tropics. 10:59-64.
  26. Yemm, E.W. and Wills, A.J. (1954). Biochem. J. 57:508-511.

Global Footprints