HUMAN ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS AND MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCE OF SLOW LEARNER YOUNG ADOLESCENTS

Article Id: ARCC1488 | Page : 216 - 221
Citation :- HUMAN ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS AND MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCE OF SLOW LEARNER YOUNG ADOLESCENTS.Asian Journal Of Dairy and Food Research.2010.(29):216 - 221
Kirtika, Sheela Sangwan and Krishna Duhan
Address : Deptt. of Human Development and Family Studies College of Home Science, CCSHAU, Hisar – 125 004, India

Abstract

The present study was conducted in Hisar district of Haryana state with the aim to
study ecological variables affecting multiple intelligence of slow learner young adolescents.
Hundred children in the age group of 12-14 years having IQ 76-89 were taken from the selected
villages and schools. Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale and the multiple intelligence tool was
used to assess the I. Q. and multiple intelligence. Micro system variables such as age, sex,
type of family, caste, education and occupation of mother, occupation of father and mother’s
relationship with in-laws were found significantly associated with interpersonal intelligence.
Meso system variables resulted significant association between existential intelligence and
father’s relationship with parents. Preference to watch TV programmes and visit to relatives/
friends were significantly associated with interpersonal intelligence. Exo system variables exerted
their influence on interpersonal intelligence through relationship of neighbours. Study concluded
that the variables of human ecological environment exerted a powerful influence on the slow
learners’ multiple intelligence. Therefore, parents of the children must be educated about the
importance of these systems to scaffold the multiple intelligence of slow learner children

Keywords

Slow learner Multiple intelligence Ecological variables Interpersonal intelligence Existentialintelligence.

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