NEW HORIZONS IN FUNCTIONAL FOOD SECTOR: AN INDIAN PERSPECTIVE

Article Id: ARCC1479
Citation :- NEW HORIZONS IN FUNCTIONAL FOOD SECTOR: AN INDIAN PERSPECTIVE.Asian Journal Of Dairy and Food Research.2010.(29)
Namrata Sutar, P.P. Sutar and Debabandya Mohapatra
Address : Faculty of Food Processing Technology and Bio-energy, Anand Agricultural University, Anand-388110, Gujarat, India

Abstract

Functional foods have been the topic of considerable interest in the food and nutrition industry
for years. India’s nutrition industry is generating US$6.8 billion in annual revenue, and that number
is expected to nearly double in the next five years. New evidence concerning the potential benefits
and challenges associated with functional foods is constantly emerging in both the scientific literature
and the popular media. The backward and forward linkages potentially create opportunities for
employment and additional income for the population from production and supply chain activities
and may increase demands for private laboratory services, training, and market. Key concerns that
may require public support include: underdeveloped infrastructure, lack of resources for research
and gap between academic research and the industry and the high costs in meeting food safety
regulations. In this article, current functional food trend from an Indian perspective and its potential
contribution to international markets is briefly discussed.

Keywords

Functional foods India Regulations Market Health benefits.

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