NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF SUBJECTS OF HISAR CITY SUFFERING FROM NON-INSULIN DEPENDENT DIABETES MELLITUS

Article Id: ARCC1451
Citation :- NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF SUBJECTS OF HISAR CITY SUFFERING FROM NON-INSULIN DEPENDENT DIABETES MELLITUS.Asian Journal Of Dairy and Food Research.2010.(29)
Savita Budhwar and Sudesh Jood*
Address : Department of Food and Nutrition, CCS Haryana Agricultural University Hisar-125 004, India.

Abstract

The study was conducted on 100 subjects (both males and females) suffering from non insulin
dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) of 30-60 years of age from Hisar city of Haryana. Majority
of the respondents were suffering from diabetes for the last 1 to 5 years. Majority of subjects had
120-200 mg/100 ml fasting and 200-300 mg/100 ml postprandial blood glucose level. Dietary
intake of the subjects was recorded by 24-hour recall method. The results indicated that NIDDM
patients consumed inadequate intake of protective foods like pulses, green leafy vegetables,
other vegetables and fruits whereas, the intake of cereals, milk and milk products, fat and oils,
sugar and jaggery was higher as per their suggested intakes. Due to higher consumption of energy
yielding foods the mean daily intake of energy, total fat, thiamine, calcium and phosphorus was
also higher while the intake of protein, fibre, riboflavin, niacin, folic acid and ascorbic acid was
inadequate. The average weight of the diabetic subjects was higher as compared to reference
standard. With regard to BMI, it was observed that majority (58 %) of the diabetic subjects were
found in the category of overweight and only 15 % in the category of obese. Mean values of waisthip
ratio (WHR) and triceps skin fold thickness (TSFT) were also found higher than their standards
as they are indicators of causing degenerative diseases.

Keywords

Non-insulin dependent subjects Diabetes mellitus Nutritional status

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