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THE EFFECT OF STAGE OF RIPENING ON THE SHELF LIFE OF TOMATOES (LYCOPERSICON ESCULENTUM) STORED IN THE EVAPORATIVE COOLING SYSTEM (E.C.S)

Article Id: ARCC1034 | Page : 299 - 301
Citation :- THE EFFECT OF STAGE OF RIPENING ON THE SHELF LIFE OF TOMATOES (LYCOPERSICON ESCULENTUM) STORED IN THE EVAPORATIVE COOLING SYSTEM (E.C.S).Asian Journal of Dairy and Food Research.2011.(30):299 - 301
R.H. Muhammad*, E. Bamisheyi and F.F. Olayemi
Address : Nigerian Stored Products Research Institutem, P.M.B. 3032, Hadejia Road Kano, Nigeria.

Abstract

The research was carried out for a period of 3 weeks on the storability of tomatoes at three different stages of ripening (i.e. matured green stage, half ripe and fully ripe). They were sub divided into two equal sets each, one was kept at room temperature (between 28-300C) in the laboratory as the control while the second set stored in the ECS at a temperature between 19-230C. Parameters like percent rot, physical appearance and percent weight loss were assessed at 3 days interval, Tomatoes stored in the ECS had lower reduction in weight while remaining fresh but with higher percent rot. Tomatoes stored at room temperature recorded higher weight loss while recording lower percentage rot with a bad appearance. The matured green tomatoes were better during storage in both Harvesting of tomatoes at a matured green stage and storing in the ECS prolongs the shelf life of the tomatoes.

Keywords

Storage Tomatoes Shelf life Evaporative cooling system.

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