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BIO-CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF CORIANDER LEAVES POWDER PREPARED USING VARIOUS DRYING METHODS

Article Id: ARCC1015 | Page : 206 - 209
Citation :- BIO-CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF CORIANDER LEAVES POWDER PREPARED USING VARIOUS DRYING METHODS.Asian Journal of Dairy and Food Research.2011.(30):206 - 209
Anju Sangwan, Asha Kawatra and Salil Sehgal
Address : Department of Food and Nutrition CCS Haryana Agiculture University, Hisar - 125 004, India

Abstract

Coriander (Coriandrum sativum) was dried using four different drying methods i.e., shade, solar, oven and microwave. Sensory analysis indicated that all types of coriander leaves powders were organoleptically acceptable and scores obtained were in the category of ‘liked moderately’. Proximate composition ranged from 0.60% to 15.56% and mineral content varied from 1.14 to 960 mg / 100g, respectively. Polyphenol content was almost similar in all the dried coriander leaves powders whereas b - carotene and ascorbic acid contents were maximum in shade dried coriander leaves powders i.e., 21.98 and 66.87 mg/100g, respectively.

Keywords

Shade dried Solar dried Oven dried Microwave dried Coriander leaves powder Sensory
analysis
b – carotene Ascorbic acid Coriandrum sativum.

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