GROWTH AND YIELD OF DIFFERENT CULTIVARS OF SESAME (SESAMUM INDICUM L.) AS INFLUENCED BY SEED APPLIED AZOTOBACTER AND PHOSPHATE SOLUBILIZING BACTERIA

Article Id: ARCC763 | Page : 326 - 330
Citation :- GROWTH AND YIELD OF DIFFERENT CULTIVARS OF SESAME (SESAMUM INDICUM L.) AS INFLUENCED BY SEED APPLIED AZOTOBACTER AND PHOSPHATE SOLUBILIZING BACTERIA.Indian Journal Of Agricultural Research.2011.(45):326 - 330
Deepa Singh Kushwaha and Zia-ul-hasan
Address : Department of Botany, Saifia Science College, Bhopal – 462 003, India

Abstract

A field experiment was conducted during kharif seasons of 2005 and 2006 to find out the effect of Azotobacter and PSB on the growth and yield attributing character of different cultivars of sesame. Study revealed that maximum root (2.20 and 1.90 cm) and shoot length (2.30 and 2.10) were observed under Azotobacter with PSB and Azotobacter treatment respectively, in cultivar TKG-22 during both years. The maximum plant height (92 and 96 cm) and height of first branch (25.50 and 24.90 cm) were also observed under Azotobacter with PSB treatment in cultivar TKG-22 during both years. Maximum number of branches per plant (21) and maximum number of nodes on main branch (19) were recorded in both cultivars under Azotobacter with PSB treatment. Minimum days of 50% flowering (36) were observed in Azotobacter with PSB, and minimum days of complete development of plant (75) were observed in Azotobacter with PSB and Azotobacter treatment in cultivar TKG-22. Maximum capsule weight (0.350 and 0.351 gm) and maximum harvest index (25.34 and 24.97 %) were recorded in cultivar TC-25 under Azotobacter with PSB treatment during both years. The maximum capsule length (2.9 and 3.0 cm) was recorded under Azotobacter with PSB and average number of seeds (72) was recorded in Azotobacter and Azotobacter with PSB treatment in cultivar TKG-22. Highest seed yield (6.32 and 6.64 gm/plant) was observed in cultivar TKG-22 under treatment of Azotobacter during both years.

Keywords

Azotobacter PSB Cultivar Sesame Growth Yield.

References

  1. Dhumal, K.N. (1992). J. Maharashtra Agri. Univ., 17 (3): 500.
  2. Gaur A.C., (1998). Proceedings of a National Workshop, IDRC-CRID-CIID, New Delhi, India, 505-529.
  3. Govindan, K. and Thirumurugan, V. (2005). Indian J. Agron., 50 (3): 214-217.
  4. Kumar, Santhosh et.al. (2006). Ann. Agric. Res. New Series, 27 (3): 227-229.
  5. Lehri, L.K. and Mehrotra, C.L. (1972). Indian J. Agric. Res., 9 (3): 201-204.
  6. Patil, R.G., Joshi, R.S. and Raman, S. (1987). Indian J. Agron. 32 (1): 12-14.
  7. Purbey, S.K. and Sen, N.L. (2007). Indian J. Agric. Res., 41 (2): 154-156.
  8. Shrivastava, H.C. and Menon, K.K.G. (1987). Indian J. Agron., 35 (2): 44-55.
  9. Singh, M.S. and Dutta, S. (2006). Agric. Rev., 27 (3): 232 – 234.
  10. Tulasaram and Mir, M.S. (2006). Indian J. Agron., 51 (3): 189-192.
  11. Suneja, P., Dudeja, S.S. and Narula, N. (2007). Archives Agron. Soil Sci, 53 (2): 221-230.

Global Footprints