TEMPERATURE EFFECT ON GROWTH PARAMETERS OF WHEAT (CV. PBW-343) USING CERES-WHEAT MODEL FOR DIFFERENT SOWING DATES IN FOOT HILLS OF WESTERN HIMALAYAS

Article Id: ARCC010 | Page : 78-82
Citation :- TEMPERATURE EFFECT ON GROWTH PARAMETERS OF WHEAT (CV. PBW-343) USING CERES-WHEAT MODEL FOR DIFFERENT SOWING DATES IN FOOT HILLS OF WESTERN HIMALAYAS.Indian Journal Of Agricultural Research.2013.(47):78-82
R.K. Pal* and S.N. Murty rkpal1985@gmail.com
Address : Department of Agrometeorology, College of Agriculture G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology-263 145, India

Abstract

To quantify the effect of temperature on productivity of wheat (cv. PBW-343) using CERES-wheat model in foot hills of Western Himalayas, experiments were conducted at the Norman E. Borlaug Crop Research Centre of GBPUAT, Pantnagar during 2007-08 and 2008-09. The experiments were laid out in split plot design (SPD) with three dates of sowing i.e. November 20, December 15 and January 09. The CERES-wheat model was calibrated based on actual data of field experiments in foot hills of Western Himalayas. All crop characters, as simulated by the CERES-wheat model, in terms of anthesis, physiological maturity and grain yield were found to have increased due to decreased units of minimum and maximum temperatures (Tmin and Tmax) and vice-versa for all sowing dates. More decreased in simulated grain yields were accounted due to increased units of Tmin (13.3, 23.7 and 34.5% by 1, 2 and 3°C, respectively) and Tmax (10.4, 20.9 and 31.5% by 1, 2 and 3°C, respectively) on 20th November sowing. While, the simulated grain yield increased significantly more on 20th November sowing due to decreased Tmin (6.0, 11.6 and 19.2% by 1, 2 and 3°C, respectively) and Tmax (9.2, 14.6 and 21.9% by 1, 2 and 3°C, respectively).

Keywords

CERES-wheat model Growth parameters Sowing dates Tmax Tmin.

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