Productivity augmentation of greengram (Vigna radiata) through weed management

DOI: 10.18805/LR-3793    | Article Id: LR-3793 | Page : 410-415
Citation :- Productivity augmentation of greengram (Vigna radiata) through weed management.Legume Research-An International Journal.2018.(41):410-415
S.P Singh, R.S Yadav, Amit Kumawat and R.R Jakhar amit.agron@gmail.com
Address : Agricultural Research Station, Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334 006, Rajasthan, India
Submitted Date : 17-10-2016
Accepted Date : 24-07-2017

Abstract

A field experiment was conducted at Research Farm of Agricultural Research Station, Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner during three consecutive kharif season of 2013, 2014 and 2015. The experiment comprising ten weeds control treatments consisting of pendamethalin 1000 g/ha (PE), imazethapyr 50g/ha (3-4 leaf stage of crop), imazethapyr 70g/ha (3-4 leaf stage of crop), pendamethalin + imazethapyr 800g/ha (PE), pendamethalin + imazethapyr  900g/ha (PE), pendamethalin + imazethapyr  1000g/ha (PE), imazethapyr + imazamox 60g/ha (3-4 leaf stage of crop), imazethapyr + imazamox 70g/ha (3-4 leaf stage of crop), 2 hand weeding at 20 and 40 DAS and weedy check in randomized block design (RBD) with three replications. Two hand weeding at 20 and 40 DAS was found most effective to control weeds in greengram and recorded lowest weed count and weed dry matter of both broad leaved and grassy weeds. It was also recorded significantly highest branches/pant, leaf area index, total chlorophyll, protein content in seed, pods/plant, seeds/pod and seed, straw and biological yield over other treatments. Among different herbicides, pendamethalin + imazethapyr 800g recorded significantly higher net returns (31350/ha) and B:C ratio (2.70).

Keywords

Greengram Herbicides Imazamox Imazethapyr Pendamethalin.

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