ANATOMY OF SESBANIA SESBAN

Article Id: ARCC3085 | Page : 211 - 218
Citation :- ANATOMY OF SESBANIA SESBAN.Indian Journal Of Agricultural Research.2001.(35):211 - 218
Dinendra Nath Sarkar and A.K.M. Azad-ud-doula Prodhan
Address : Department of Crop Botany Bangladesh Agri~ultural University, Mymensingh, eangladesh

Abstract

Anatomical investigation has been made on the stem and root of Sesbania sesban at different stages of growth. Xylem has been found to be the first vascular tissue to differentiate. The root is tetrflrch with four strands of xylem and four strands of phloem. One strand of xylem alternates with one strand of phloem. The epidermis is single layered. Beneath the epidermis there are cortex with some tannin cells. The cambium appears at the basal part of the root and gradually it extends towards the root apex. The phellogen appears in the deeper cortex and produced 8–12 layers of cork cells and 4–6 layers of phelloderm. In the stem, the epidermis is single layered. Beneath the epidermis there are 9–10 layers of cortex with lots of tanniniferous cells. The vascular bundles are of two types, small and large with bundle caps. In the large vascular bundle, the primary phloem consists of a number of sieve elements while in the small bundle there are parenchymatous tissue with or without functional sieve element. The large vascular bundle con tains 5–7 strands of xylem while the small bundle contains 1 or 2. Thli cambium differentiates in between xylem and phloem of the primary structures of the stem. It becomes active and gives rise to secondary phloem and secondary xlyem. The vessels are small and big. The smaller vassels lie in between or among the vessels. Most of the vessels are in pairs. Among the elements of secondary phloem, axial parenchyma has been found to occupy the major area. The periderm develops one after another from deeper cortex.

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