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An Economic Analysis of Mung Bean Seed Production Technology in Mau District of Eastern Uttar Pradesh

DOI: 10.18805/LR-4169    | Article Id: LR-4169 | Page : 1260-1264
Citation :- An Economic Analysis of Mung Bean Seed Production Technology in Mau District of Eastern Uttar Pradesh.Legume Research.2021.(44):1260-1264
Govind Pal, Udaya Bhaskar K., S.P. Jeevan Kumar, Sripathy K.V., Kalyani Kumari and D.K. Agarwal drpal1975@gmail.com
Address : ICAR- Indian Institute of Seed Science, Mau-275 103, Uttar Pradesh, India.
Submitted Date : 20-05-2019
Accepted Date : 6-09-2019

Abstract

The present study was based on primary data collected from 50 farmers from Mau district of Uttar Pradesh during the agricultural year 2017-18. The analysis of data shows that the ratio of fixed and variable cost in Mung bean seed production was 18:82. Human labour was the major component of cost (39.69 per cent of total cost) followed by machine labour (15.31 per cent), manures and fertilizers (7.54 per cent), irrigation (6.23 per cent), seed (4.77 per cent), plant protection chemicals (4.54 per cent) and seed certification charges (1.53 per cent). The total cost in seed production of Mung bean was Rs. 38547 per hectare. The gross return and net return was Rs. 56175 and Rs. 17628 per hectare respectively. The BC ratio was 1.46. The total cost of cultivation in Mung bean certified seed production was around 31.29 per cent higher than grain production while, gross return was about 49.80 per cent higher in seed production than grain production. Consequently, net return from seed production of Mung bean was 116.56 per cent higher than grain production. According to cost C2, cost of production of Mung bean grain and seed estimated to Rs. 3915 and Rs. 4591 per quintal. The return to the farmers on cost C2 was 27.71 and 45.72 per cent above cost of production for Mung bean grain and seed, respectively. Similarly, cost of production according to cost A2 & FL (Family Labour) of Mung bean grain and seed was estimated to be Rs. 3089 and Rs. 3852 per quintal. The return to the farmers on cost A2 & FL was 61.86 and 73.68 per cent above cost of production for Mung bean grain and seed, respectively. Production of Mung bean seed has resulted in higher profitability proposition for the farmers. The net return from Mung bean seed production was encouraging and the same may be popularized among farmers to increase area under Mung bean seed production and thus to enhance profitability to the farmers and also to ensure increased availability of quality seed to the farmers. 

Keywords

Economic analysis Mung bean Seed production

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