Legume Research

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Legume Research, volume 44 issue 1 (january 2021) : 31-35

Genotype × Environment (GxE) interaction and stability analysis of diverse elite kabuli chickpea lines for phenological and yield related traits under normal and heat stress environment

Neha Dhuria1, Anita Babbar1,*
1Department of Plant Breeding and Genetics, Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya, Jabalpur-482 004, Madhya Pradesh, India.
  • Submitted20-07-2018|

  • Accepted24-10-2018|

  • First Online 23-02-2019|

  • doi 10.18805/LR-4064

Cite article:- Dhuria Neha, Babbar Anita (2019). Genotype × Environment (GxE) interaction and stability analysis of diverse elite kabuli chickpea lines for phenological and yield related traits under normal and heat stress environment . Legume Research. 44(1): 31-35. doi: 10.18805/LR-4064.
68 kabuli chickpea lines were studied for different traits to know the role of genotype x environment (G×E) interaction and analyze stability under high temperature across the normal, late and very late planting dates at JNKVV,Jabalpur during rabi 2014-15. Differences among genotypes were significant for all traits; G×E interaction showed significant differences for days to maturity and seed yield. Variance due to environment found significant for all characters except days to maturity.GXE interaction(linear) exhibited significant differences for days to maturity and seed yield. Pooled deviation found significant for seed yield. Promising lines viz., CSJK46, PhuleG0517, ICCV13310, ICCV13312,FLIP-07-236C,FLIP-07-283C,FLIP-07-286C,JGK1,JGK 25 and JGK 26 found stable for most of the characters and may be grown under wide range of environments including high temperature conditions. ICCV13312 and JGK26 found highly stable with mean values greater than grand mean and regression coefficient lesser than one with deviation from regression minimum. GenotypesHK10-109,IPCK2009-145, CSJK4, PKV4, ICCV13306, ICCV13303, JGK24, JGK23 and JGK3 found most promising lines in minimum yield reduction in all planting dates.
In any breeding programme it is necessary to find out phenotypically stable genotypes for seed yield which could perform more or less uniformly under different environmental conditions. Seed yield is complex character and largely depends upon its component characters, an interaction with the environment resulting into the ultimate product i.e., seed yield. G×E interactions are of major importance to the plant breeder in developing improved varieties. When varieties are compared over a series of environments, the relative rankings usually differ. Therefore, an attempt has been made in the present study to evaluate different kabuli chickpea lines across the season to know the role of G×E interaction and also analyze stability under high temperature of genotypes for different traits. Sustainability in chickpea production in this part of the world can be achieved through the development of heat tolerant, high yielding, stable genotypes possessing wider agro-ecological adaptability (Naveed et al., 2016).
The present investigation was carried out during Rabi 2014-15 at JNKVV, Jabalpur (M.P.) to evaluate the 68 indigenous and exotic kabuli chickpea lines obtained from JNKVV Jabalpur; IIPR, Kanpur; ICRISAT, Pattancheru and ICARDA, Morocco to evaluate and isolate superior kabuli lines in different environments by manipulating different planting dates i.e., normal planting (EI -25 Nov 2014), late planting (EII -25 Dec 2014), very late planting (EIII-25 Jan 2015) and Pooled. Experiments were laid out in randomized completely block design with three replications, 45cm row distance using 4m row length including three checks i.e., JGK1, JGK2 and KAK2. Standard statistical analysis was employed to generate data for different analysis in accordance with method described by Eberhart and Russell (1966) by using recommended agronomic practices for normal crop growth.
Experimental material responded differently to varying environmental conditions implying that for achieving sustainability inchickpea production; studies pertaining to G×E interactions should be an integral part of chickpea improvement plans. G×E interaction showed the significant differences for DM, BY and SY indicates differential response of the genotype to different planting conditions in close harmony with Singh and Singh (2013), Carreras et al., (2013) and Tilihun et al., (2015) for DM, BY and SY. The variance due to environment found significant for all the characters except DM however, environment linear was observed significant for all the characters. (Table 1) G×E (linear) showed the significant differences for DM,DF 50%, BY and SY suggested that prediction for these attributes would be perfect, these results supporting the earlier findings of Tilihun et al., (2015), Kanouni et al., (2015) and Tilihun et al., (2015). However, pooled deviation was found to be significant for DI, TP and SY. 
 

Table 1: ANOVA for stability analysis.


       
Through comprehensive observations; genotypes viz., PhuleG 0517 (DM and TP), ICCV13312 (SY), FLIP-07-236C (DFI and DPI), FLIP-07-283C (DFI, DPI and DM),  FLIP-07-286C (DFI, DF50%, DPI and DM), JGK25 (TP) and JGK26 (SY) exhibited stable performance for these traits (Table 2 and 3). Hence, these promising genotypes may be grown under wide range of environments particularly in tolerance to terminal heat.
 

Table 2: Stability parameters for days to flower initiation, days to 50% flowering, days to pod initiation and days to maturity.


 

Table 3: Stability parameters for total number of pods per plant, biological yield per plant and seed yield per plant.


       
SY was found high innormal, late and very late planting in genotypes ICCV13312, ICCV13314, JGK 26, JGK 27, JGK12, JGK14, JGK 23, JGK1, JGK2, JGK3 and KAK 2.
       
Twenty two genotypes viz; JGK12, JGK 1, ICCV13312, ICCV 13317, ICCV13314, JGK 26, JGK2, JGK25, JGK3, KAK2, ICCV13316, NBeG 402, NBeG 176, JGK14, ICCV 13310, JGK 23, JGK 27, HK 10-124, FLIP-01-29C, IPCK 2004-29-1, CSJK 46 and ICCV13301 were identified on better seed yield under late planting. (Table 3). Similarly, 23 genotypes KAK2, ICCV13309,  ICCV13311, ICCV13312, ICCV13304, JGK12, ICCV13314, CSJK 46, ICCV13302, ICCV13307, JGK18, JGK 23, JGK2, JGK14, JGK1, ICCV13317, ICCV13318, HK10-103, JGK26, JGK3, CSJK77, JGK27 and Phule G051 were high yielding lines in very late planting conditions.
       
The timing of flowering and days to maturity is accelerated under heat stress, thus shortening the duration of crop development and reducing seed yield. The entries HK10-109, IPCK2009-145,CSJK4, PKV4, ICCV13306, ICCV13303, JGK 24, JGK 23, JGK3 were found most promising lines in case of minimum yield reduction in all normal, late and very late planting dates.
Promising lines viz., CSJK46, PhuleG 0517, ICCV13310, ICCV13312, FLIP-07-236C, FLIP-07-283C, FLIP-07-286C, JGK1, JGK 25 and JGK26 found stable for most of the characters. Hence, these genotypes may be grown under wide range of environments including high temperature condition in late planting dates. Lines ICCV13312 and JGK26 found highly stable with mean values greater than grand mean and regression coefficient lesser than one with deviation from regression minimum. The entries HK 10-109, IPCK 2009-145, CSJK 4, PKV 4, ICCV13306, ICCV13303, JGK24, JGK23 and JGK3 found most promising lines in case of minimum yield reduction in all planting dates.These promising lines should be evaluated over years and locations to obtain the clear cut picture of yield and its contributing traits under heat stress environment for sustained chickpea production.

  1. Carreras J, Rubio J, Flores F, Millan T and Gil J. (2013). Genotype × environment interaction analysis in two chickpea RIL populations. Spanish J of Agril. Res. 11:3.

  2. Eberhart SA and Russell WA. (1966). Stability parameters for comparing varieties. Crop Sci. 6: 36-40.

  3. Kanouni H, Farayedi Y, Saeid A, Sabaghpour SH. (2015). Stability analyses for seed yield of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) genotypes in the Western Cold Zone of Iran. J of Agri Sci. 7(5):219.


  4. Singh AK and Singh AP. (2013). Study of genetic variability and interaction of some quantitative traits in chickpea (Cicer arietinum. L). TECHNOFAME- A Journal of Multidisciplinary Advance Research. 2: 87-94.

  5. Tilahun G, Mekbib F, Fikre A and Eshete M. 2015. Genotype x environment interaction and stability analysis for yield and yield related traits of Kabuli-type Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) in Ethiopia. African J of Biotech. 14(18): 1564-1575.

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