SUPERIOR SYMBIOTIC PERFORMANCE OF NATIVE BRADYRHIZOBIA ISOLATES OVER FOREIGN INOCULANTS WITH COWPEA CULTIVARS IN INDIA

DOI: 10.5958/j.0976-0571.37.2.026    | Article Id: LR-2925 | Page : 175-179
Citation :- SUPERIOR SYMBIOTIC PERFORMANCE OF NATIVE BRADYRHIZOBIA ISOLATES OVER FOREIGN INOCULANTS WITH COWPEA CULTIVARS IN INDIA.Legume Research-An International Journal.2014.(37):175-179
C. Appunu*, Ravinder Kumar, C. Mahadevaiah, V. Sreenivasa, Devyani Sen and Banshi Dhar cappunu@gmail.com
Address : Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005, India

Abstract

Efficiency of symbiotic interactions of native and foreign inoculants bradyrhizobia isolates with six cowpea varieties (CO1, CO3, CO4, CO6, Paiyur 1 and Vamban 1) were evaluated under field conditions. Based on sequence analysis of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer (IGS) region, three native isolates were classified as B. yuanmingense. Cowpea varieties inoculated with bradyrhizobia showed significantly superior nodulation, nitrogenase activity, dry matter accumulation, and seed yield compared to uninoculated treatments. The native B. yuanmingense strains CR03 and CR09 exhibited host-cultivar specificity with CO3, and Paiyur 1, respectively. Plants inoculated with native B. yuanmingense isolates produced higher plant dry matter accumulation and seed yield compared to foreign B. japonicum inoculated plants. Correlation coefficients analysis revealed that plant dry matter accumulation emerged as the best criterion for selection of effective cowpea-bradyrhizobia associations in given physical and biological conditions.

Keywords

Cowpea B. yuanmingense Nitrogen fixation Symbiotic efficiency.

References

  1. Ampomah, O.Y., Ofori-Ayeh, E., Solheim, B., Svenning, M.M. (2008). Host range, symbiotic effectiveness and nodulation competitiveness of some indigenous cowpea bradyrhizobia isolates from the transitional savanna zone of Ghana. Afr. J. Biotechnol. 7(8): 988-996.
  2. Appunu, C., Sen, D., Singh, M.K., Dhar, B. (2008). Variation in symbiotic performance of Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains and soybean cultivars under field conditions. J. Central European Agri. 9(1): 185-190.
  3. Appunu, C., Dhar B. (2008). Isolation and symbiotic characteristics of two Tn5-derived phage-resistant Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains that nodulate soybean. Curr. Microbiol. 57:212–217
  4. Appunu, C., N’Zoue, A., Moulin, L., Depret, G., Laguerre, G. (2009). Vigna mungo, V. radiata and V. unguiculata plants sampled in different agronomical-ecological climatic regions of India are nodulated by Bradyrhizobium yuanmingense. Syst. Appl. Microbiol. 32: 460-470.
  5. Botha, W.J., Bloem, J.F., Law, I.J. (2002). Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus) in the winter rainfall region of South Africa. Biol. Fertil. Soils. 36: 335-343.
  6. Da, H.N., Deng, S.P. (2003). Survival and persistence of genetically modified Sinorhizobium meliloti in soil. Appl. Soil Ecol. 22: 1-14.
  7. Fall, L., Diouf, D., Fall-Ndiaye, M.A., Badiane, F.A., Gueye, M. (2003). Genetic diversity in cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] varieties determined by ARA and RAPD techniques. Afr. J. Biotechnol. 2(2): 48-50.
  8. Fening, J.O., Danso, S.K.A. (2001). Response of cowpea to inoculation with indigenous Bradyrhizobium strains. Trop. Sci. 41: 172-176.
  9. Hefny, M., Dolinski, R., Malek, W. (2001). Variation in symbiotic characters of alfalfa cultivars inoculated with Sinorhizobium meliloti strains. Biol. Fertil. Soils. 33: 435-437.
  10. Law, I.J., Botha, W.F., Majaule, U.C., Phalane, F.L. (2007). Symbiotic and genomic diversity of ‘cowpea’ bradyrhizobia from soils in Botswana and South Africa. Biol. Fertil. Soils. 43: 653-663.
  11. Musiyiwa, K., Mpepereki, S., Giller, K.E. (2005). Symbiotic effectiveness and host ranges of indigenous rhizobia nodulating promiscuous soybean varieties in Zimbabwean soils. Soil Biol. Biochem. 37: 1169-1176.
  12. Pule-Meulenberg, F., Belane, A.K., Krasova-Wade, T., Dakora, F.D. (2010). Symbiotic functioning and bradyrhizobial biodiversity of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) in Africa. BMC Microbiol. 10: 89-100.
  13. Sarr, P.S., Yamakawa, T., Fujimoto, S., Saeki, Y., Thao H.T.B., Myint, A.K. (2009). Phylogenetic diversity and symbiotic effectiveness of root-nodulating bacteria associated with cowpea in the South-West area of Japan. Microbes Environ. 24:105-112.
  14. SAS Institute, SAS/STAT user’s guide (1988). SAS, Cary, N.C.
  15. Singh, B.B. (1999). Improved drought tolerant cowpea varieties for the Sahel Project 11. Cowpea-cereal system improvement for the savannas, IITA, Ibadan, Nigeria, p. 36.
  16. Somasegaran, P., Hoben, H.J. (1994). Handbook for Rhizobia, Methods in Legume-Rhizobium Technology, p.1-450. Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg, Germany.
  17. Thies, J.R., Bohlool, B.B., Singleton, P.W. (1991). Influence of the size of indigenous rhizobial populations on establishment and symbiotic performance of introduced rhizobia on field-grown legumes. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 57: 19-28.
  18. Vance, C.P. (2001). Symbiotic nitrogen fixation and phosphorus acquisition. Plant nutrition in a world of declining renewable resources. Pl. Physiol. 127: 390-397.

Global Footprints