SEED INVIGORATION TREATMENTS FOR IMPROVED GERMINABILITY AND FIELD PERFORMANCE OF GRAM (CICER ARlET1NUM L.)

Article Id: ARCC3679 | Page : 257 - 261
Citation :- SEED INVIGORATION TREATMENTS FOR IMPROVED GERMINABILITY AND FIELD PERFORMANCE OF GRAM (CICER ARlET1NUM L.).Legume Research-An International Journal.2006.(29):257 - 261
N. Layek, B.K. De, S.K. Mishra and A.K. Mandai·
Address : Department of Seed Science and Technology, institute of Agricultural Science, 35 Ballygunge Circular Road, Kolkata 700 019, India

Abstract

Pre-storage dry seed invigoration treatments of freshly harvested gram (Cicer arietinum L.) with chemicals (common bleaching powder at 2 g/kg of seed; calcium carbonate at 3 g/kg of seed and iodinated calcium carbonate at 3 g/kg of seed), pharmaceutical formulation (aspirin at 50 mg/kg of seed) and crude plant materials (finely powered dry red chilli fruit, at 1 g/kg of seed) showed significantly improved post-storage germinability as well as field performance of the resultant crop over untreated control. Among the dry treatments, bleaching powder, aspirin and red chilli powder has shown better results in improving storability and field performance of gram seeds. But pre-storage wet treatments did not show any improvement on germinability and field performance over control, probably due to soaking injury in harvest fresh (high-vigour) seed. On the basis of the result, dry treatments in high-vigour gram seeds with bleaching powder @2 g/kg of seed, aspirin @50 mg/kg of seed and red chilli powder @1 g/kg of seed are suggested for improved storability and field performance of gram.

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