ANALYSIS OF VARIABILITY IN DIFFERENT GENOTYPES OF PEA (PISUM SATIVUM L.) ON THE BASIS OF PROTEIN MARKERS

Article Id: ARCC2070 | Page : 265-269
Citation :- ANALYSIS OF VARIABILITY IN DIFFERENT GENOTYPES OF PEA (PISUM SATIVUM L.) ON THE BASIS OF PROTEIN MARKERS.Legume Research-An International Journal.2009.(32):265-269
Sonali Guleria, Saroj Dua, Nirmala Chongtham
Address : Department of Botany, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160 014, India.

Abstract

Seeds of 10 varieties of pea procured from Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana and
Haryana Agricultural University, Hissar, India and grown in research farm at Panjab University,
Chandigarh for three successive generations were analyzed for total protein and banding patterns
of protein fractions. Significant varietal variations in the mature dry seeds of pea genotypes for
total protein (14.95% to 22.44%), albumins (3.30% to 6.35%), globulins (7.97% to 10.53 %),
glutelins (1.15% to 3.05 %) and prolamins (0.46% to 1.50 %) were observed for the means of
three years. Seed storage protein banding profile was also studied by performing SDSPolyacrylamide
gel electrophoresis. A total of 20-21 bands were observed in all the ten genotypes.
Except for some minor differences in the intensity of the bands, major differences were not
recorded in the protein profiles.

Keywords

Legume seeds Protein content Protein fractions SDS-PAGE.

References

  1. Boulter D. et al. (1987). Pl. Physiol. Biochem. 25:283-289.
  2. Boulter D. and Croy R.R.D. (1997). Adv. Bot. Res. 27:1-84.
  3. Casey R. et al. (1982). Pl. Foods Hum. Nutr. 31:33-346.
  4. Collada C. et al. (1991). J. Exp. Bot. 42:1305-1310.
  5. Cooke R.J., (1986). Electrophoresis 7:203-217.
  6. Gottschalk W. et al. (1975). Egypt J. Genet. Cytol. 4:453-468.
  7. Hames B.O. and Rickwood D. (1990). Gel Electrophoresis of Proteins; a Practical Approach. 2nd ed. Oxford University Press, U.S.A.
  8. Higgins T.J.V. (1984). Ann. Rev. Pl. Physiol. 35:191-221.
  9. Ignacimuthu, S. and Arockiadass A. (1993). Madras Agric. J. 80:252-254.
  10. Iqbal A. et al. (2006). Food Chem. 97:331-35.
  11. Kumar P. et al. (2004). Haryana J. Hort. Sci. 33:243-45.
  12. Ladizinsky G. and Hymowitz T. (1979). Theor. Appl. Genet. 51:145-151.
  13. Laemmli U.K. (1970). Nature. 227:680-685.
  14. Lowry O.H. et al. (1951). J. Biol. Chem. 193:265-275.
  15. Mariotti F. et al. (2001). J. Nutr. 131:1706-1713.
  16. Matta N.K. and Gatehouse J.A. (1982). Heredity. 48:383-392.
  17. McPhee K. (2003). Food Agric. & Environ. 1:64-69.
  18. Miller M.K. et al. (1972). Crop. Sci. 12:535- 537.
  19. Naik M.S. (1968). Indian J. Genet. 28:142-146.
  20. Sathe S.K. (2002). Cr. Rev. in Biotech. 22:175-223.
  21. Shinde K.G. (2000). Orissa J. Hort. 28:21-24.
  22. Sureja A.K. and Sharma R.R. (2000). Indian J. Hort. 57:243-47.
  23. Turner S.R. et al. (1990). Pl. Mol. Biol. 14:793-803.
  24. Valizadeh M. (2001). J. Agric. Sci. Technol. 3:287-92.
  25. Vandana A.T. and Dubey D.K. (1994). Lens. Newsl. 21:16-18.
  26. Welch R.M. (2005). Food. Nutr. Bull. 26:419-21.

Global Footprints