COMPARATIVE STUDIES ON PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SCENTED AND NON- SCENTED STRAINS OF MUNG BEANS (VIGNA RADIATA) OF INDIAN ORIGIN

Article Id: ARCC1267 | Page : 1 - 9
Citation :- COMPARATIVE STUDIES ON PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SCENTED AND NON- SCENTED STRAINS OF MUNG BEANS (VIGNA RADIATA) OF INDIAN ORIGIN.Legume Research-An International Journal.2010.(33):1 - 9
Moumita Pal, Ratan Lal Brahmachary1 and Mahua Ghosh*
Address : Oil Technology Division, Dept. of Chemical Technology, University of Calcutta, Kolkata.

Abstract

Mungbean is a widely consumed legume of India as well as of Asia. In India, two varieties of this
bean, scented and non-scented, are available. The scented variety produces a beautiful aroma when
fried, boiled or cooked. This study was carried out for comparison of the physicochemical and
biochemical characteristics of these two varieties. The inter-varietals variation in moisture, sugar,
lipid, phospholipids, protein and lipid composition as well as fatty acid composition of the triglyceride
oil was investigated in this study. Characterization of sterols was also made by GC. Detailed study of
amino acid composition of the two variant was also reported. The study of ultra-structure of the
scented and non-scented mung bean was done by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Except the physical
structure and ultrastructure, no appreciable differences were found between the strains though the
difference in aroma composition was already established.

Keywords

Mung bean 2 AP Maillard reaction Proline Scanning Electron Microscopy Ultrastructure Basmati rice

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