Comparative effects of different concentrations of garlic (Allium sativum) and ginger (Zingiber Officinale) on growth performance, goblet cell histochemistry and gut microbiota of broilers

DOI: 10.18805/ijar.B-1105    | Article Id: B-1105 | Page : 874-878
Citation :- Comparative effects of different concentrations of garlic (Allium sativum) and ginger (Zingiber Officinale) on growth performance, goblet cell histochemistry and gut microbiota of broilers.Indian Journal Of Animal Research.2020.(54):874-878
Muhammad Usman Saleem, Muhammad Arshad Javid, Saleem Akthar, Faisal Ayub Kiani, Omer Naseer and Muhammad Yasir Waqas usmansaleem@bzu.edu.pk
Address : Department of Bio-Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan, Pakistan.  
Submitted Date : 11-02-2019
Accepted Date : 5-07-2019

Abstract

The present study investigates comparative effects of different concentrations of garlic (Allium sativum) and ginger (Zingiber Officinale) on growth performance and selected histo-microbial parameters of broilers.  A total of 80 one day- old chicks were divided into five different groups with each group having 4 replicates in a trial of 42 days. The first group was kept as control whereas, the second, third, fourth and fifth groups were given garlic 0.25%, garlic 0.5%, ginger 0.25% and ginger 0.5% respectively. At the end of trial all birds were slaughtered for analysis. Results revealed that feed conversion ratio and live body weight were significantly (P < 0.05) improved by garlic 0.5% supplementation compared to other groups. Histo-microbiology revealed that lactic acid bacteria, yeast, acidic goblet cells, mixed goblet cells and total goblet cells increased significantly (P < 0.05) by the dietary supplementations under study. In was concluded that 0.5% garlic supplementation was a better alternate to antibiotic in broilers.

Keywords

Feed intake Goblet cells Intestinal microarchitecture LAB Small intestine Yeast

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