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Haematological Traits of Induced Hypovolemic Large White Yorkshire Piglets as Affected by Feeding them Milk of Pantja Goats and Black Badri Cows

DOI: 10.18805/IJAR.B-4427    | Article Id: B-4427 | Page : 1096-1100
Citation :- Haematological Traits of Induced Hypovolemic Large White Yorkshire Piglets as Affected by Feeding them Milk of Pantja Goats and Black Badri Cows.Indian Journal of Animal Research.2021.(55):1096-1100
M. Dineshkumar, D.V. Singh, S.K. Rastogi, Sanjay Kumar, S.K. Singh, Anil Kumar singhdvs56@gmail.com
Address : Department of Livestock Production Management, College of Veterinary and Animal Science, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar-263 145, Uttarakhand, India.
Submitted Date : 15-02-2021
Accepted Date : 26-05-2021

Abstract

Background: Pig is recognized as an advantageous non-rodent animal model within a large number of biomedical research areas and of xenotransplantation of animal organs into humans. People prefer taking goat milk during dengue fever like conditions for recovery from low blood constituents, particularly the blood platelets, without any scientific proof. 
Methods: Haemoglobin, Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) and blood platelets count were studied in 2.5 months old 18 experimentally induced hypovolemic Large White Yorkshire (LWY) piglets at CVASc., GBPUAT, Pantnagar after feeding them milk of Pantja goats and black Badri cows over a period of 30 days during Oct.–Nov. 2019 and May-June 2020. Hypovolemia in piglets was achieved by withdrawing their 15% of total estimated blood volume (@ 7.5% in each time on day 1st and 3rd of experiment), followed by providing them with milk, which was double the amount of blood withdrawn, for 30 days. Control group (T1) piglets (6 no.) were maintained on basal diet, whereas group T2 and T3 piglets were given milk of Pantja goats and black Badri cows, respectively. Blood samples for testing were collected on 1st, 3rd, 7th, 15th and 30th day.
Result: Average normal blood picture of weaned LWY piglets for haemoglobin (g/dl), ESR (mm/hr) and platelets count (105 cells/ mm3) was 11.36 ± 0.20, 10.00± 2.01, 3.1767 ± 0.2577, respectively. For haemoglobin and ESR, the values on testing days and the overall values for group T1, T2 and T3 piglets did not show any significant variation. However, the pooled values for haemoglobin were significantly different (P<0.01) on various testing days, being higher on day 1st and 30th than on 3rd, 7th and 15th day, implying that normal haemoglobin level was regained on 30th day of hypovolemia. The pooled values for ESR were significantly different (P<0.05) on various testing days, being higher on day 1st and 3rd only, which may be due to simultaneous increase in total erythrocyte counts. Overall mean platelets count (x10cells/ mm3) for LWY piglets was 3.2570± 0.0890 and their values in group T1, T2 and T3 piglets were 3.0983±0.1675, 3.0820±0.1490 and 3.5907±0.1885, respectively, being significantly higher (P<0.05) for black Badri cow milk fed group piglets. This may imply usefulness of black Badri cow milk over Pantja goat milk in improving blood platelets count in human, considering pig a good animal model for human within a large number of biomedical researches.

Keywords

Badri cow ESR Haemoglobin Hypovolemia Large white yorkshire piglets Pantja goat Platelets

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