Breeding and calf rearing management practices followed in Varanasi district of Uttar Pradesh, India

DOI: 10.18805/ijar.9643    | Article Id: B-2909 | Page : 799-803
Citation :- Breeding and calf rearing management practices followed inVaranasi district of Uttar Pradesh, India .Indian Journal Of Animal Research.2016.(50):799-803

Satya Prakash Yadav, Vinod Kumar Paswan*, Pushkraj Sawant and Basant Kumar Bhinchhar

vkpaswan.vet@gmail.com
Address :

Department of Animal Husbandry and Dairying, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005, India.

Submitted Date : 14-10-2015
Accepted Date : 8-02-2016

Abstract

A study on breeding and calf rearing management practices of Varanasi district in Uttar Pradesh was carried on by collecting data from 250 dairy farmers of 5 different block viz. Sewapuri, Kashi Vidyapeeth, Arajiline, Rohaniya and Chiriagoan of Varanasi district. The study revealed that almost all the respondents relayed only on symptoms of estrus and particularly mucus discharge alone (33.6%) or in combination of other symptoms of estrus like bellowing (45.2%) and restlessness (21.2%) for heat detection in their animals. Respondents were breeding their animals by AI (26.8%), natural service (26.8%) and by both (46.4%). Mostly (73.2%) respondents mate their animals after 18 hrs of heat detection, while maximum (41.6%) number of respondents bred their animals between 3-5 months after calving. In case of calf rearing management practices, study revealed that 70% of respondents attended their animals during calving, while only 30.4% of respondents practiced ligation, cutting and disinfection of navel cord. Only 32% respondents fed their calves colostrum within 2 hrs of birth. 66.4% of respondents weaned their calves at 3 months of age, rest never weaned their calves. Majority 57.6% of farmers provided calf starter to their calves, while 42.4% didn’t provided calf starter and 68.4% of respondents fed fodder to their calves around 2 months of age. Only 38% respondents were dehorning their calves and 33.2% castrating their male calves in the study area.

Keywords

Breeding practices Calf rearing management Reproduction.

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