Outcome of different regimes of treatment for uterine torsion in bovine at field level – A clinical study

DOI: 10.18805/ijar.7045    | Article Id: B-2770 | Page : 819-822
Citation :- Outcome of different regimes of treatment for uterine torsion in bovine at field level – A clinical study .Indian Journal Of Animal Research.2015.(49):819-822

P.M. Mane* and R.D. Bhangre

prashvet008@gmail.com
Address :

S. R. Throat Milk and Milk Products Pvt. Ltd., Sangamner, Ahmednagar-422 605, India.

Abstract

Total 41 bovine field cases (buffalo 27 and cow 14) of uterine torsion were studied for the outcome of treatment and survival rate of dam by Sharma’s modified method. Caesarean section was done in animals with incomplete cervical dilatation and neglected cases. For this study animals were divided into 3 groups depending upon the onset of labour pains. In Group I (upto 36 hrs) comprised fresh cases and detorsion with Sharma’s modified method. In Group II (upto 36-72 hrs) comprised those cases not relived by rolling of cervix failed to dilate cesarean section were  performed. In Group III (beyond 72 hrs) comprised of all neglected cases of uterine torsion where caesarean was performed.  The overall dam survival rates in the three respective groups were 87.50 per cent, 55.55 per cent, and 62.5 per cent, respectively. In the present study, the incidences of maternal and foetal mortality were 21.95 per cent and 43.90 per cent, respectively. Higher incidence of uterine torsion was recorded in pluriparous (73.17 per cent) bovine and occurrence of right sided uterine torsion in (92.68 per cent) of cases. The majority of the calves delivered were male (73.17 per cent). In conclusion, quick approach and early execution of right type of treatment for torsion helped in better survival rate to dam and foetus. The Sharma’s modified method is best method in fresh and unspoiled cases of uterine torsion.

Keywords

Bovines Incidence Survival rate Treatment regimes Uterine torsion.

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