Diagnostic potential of polymerase chain reaction in detection of classical swine fever virus infection in slaughtered pigs

DOI: 10.5958/0976-0555.2015.00083.7    | Article Id: B-2688 | Page : 512-514
Citation :- Diagnostic potential of polymerase chain reaction in detection of classical swine fever virus infection in slaughtered pigs.Indian Journal Of Animal Research.2015.(49):512-514
M. Rout, G. Saikumar and K. Nagarajan drmrout@gmail.com
Address : Division of Pathology, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar, Bareilly-243 122, India.

Abstract

The present work was carried out to study the diagnostic potential of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in detection of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) infection in slaughtered pigs of Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh during 2005. A total of 1120 pigs were examined for CSF suggestive pathological lesions and tissue samples were tested for CSFV genome by RT-PCR. Out of 1120 cases examined, 110 (9.82%) showed lesions suggestive for CSF. Based on pathological findings, 58.18% (64/110) were categorized as acute, 16.36% (18/110) as chronic and 25.45% (28/110) as inapparent form of CSF. Based on RT-PCR targeting 5’NTR and E2/NS2 region, the prevalence of CSF was found to be 4.82% (54/1120) and 3.83% (43/1120), respectively. RT-PCR thus ensures a sensitive and specific detection of CSFV and hence can be considered as a screening method of choice.

Keywords

Classical swine fever Diagnosis Polymerase chain reaction Slaughtered pigs.

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