GENETIC POLYMORPHISM OF HAEMOGLOBIN IN RED KANDHARI CATTLE

Article Id: ARCC3278 | Page : 151 - 154
Citation :- GENETIC POLYMORPHISM OF HAEMOGLOBIN IN RED KANDHARI CATTLE.Indian Journal Of Animal Research.2006.(40):151 - 154
C.P. Vedpathak, A.D. Deshpande and P.K. Madke
Address : College of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Marathwada Agricultural University, Parbhani - 431 402, India

Abstract

The present investigation was carried out on blood samples and data on economic traits collected
from cattle breeding farm for Red Kandhari, College of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Parbhani,
to study the genetic polymorphism of haemoglobin. Blood sample analysis revealed two haemoglobin variants with three phenotype viz., HbAA, HbBB and HbAB. Gene frequency for HbAA, and HbBB were 0.52, and 0.48, respectively. Genotype frequency of HbAA, HbBB and HbAB were
30, 26 and 44 respectively. Analysis of various economic traits under haemoglobin type revealed
that haemoglobin type showed significant effect on age at maturity and service period.

Keywords

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