ENZYMATIC PROFILES OF ACID AND ALKALINE PHOSPHATASES IN OVARIAN ANTRAL FOLLICULAR FLUID OF BUFFALOES*

Article Id: ARCC3188 | Page : 106 - 110
Citation :- ENZYMATIC PROFILES OF ACID AND ALKALINE PHOSPHATASES IN OVARIAN ANTRAL FOLLICULAR FLUID OF BUFFALOES*.Indian Journal Of Animal Research.2007.(41):106 - 110
G.P. Kalmath and J.P. Ravindra1**
Address : Department of Veterinary Physiology, Veterinary College, Bangalore - 560 024, India

Abstract

Enzymatic profiles of alkaline and acid phosphatases in the buffalo ovarian antral follicular
fluid were studied using ovaries procured from Civil Slaughterhouse, Bangalore. Antral follicular
fluid aspirated from small (6 mm), medium (6-10 mm) andlarge (11-16 mm) follicles was
analyzed for phosphatase activity using clinical analyzer (photometer, BT-224 Biotechnica
instruments). The acid phosphatase activity decreased with advancement in follicular size reaching
the lowest value in large follicle group. Similar trend was observed with respect to the alkaline
phosphatase activity. The acid and alkaline phosphatase activities were highest during the
hotter months of April and June when the monthly average mean temperatures were (27.200C)
and (25.850C) respectively. It was lowest during the cooler months of December and January,
when the ambient temperatures were (21.200C) and (20.950C) respectively. However during
July and August, the activity was intermediate. From the study it was concluded that the
enzyme activity decreased with the follicular development and it increased with the increase in
ambient temperature

Keywords

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