MINERAL PROFILES OF OVARIAN ANTRAL FOLLICULAR FLUID IN BUFFALOES DURING FOLLICULAR DEVELOPMENT*

Article Id: ARCC3185 | Page : 87 - 93
Citation :- MINERAL PROFILES OF OVARIAN ANTRAL FOLLICULAR FLUID IN BUFFALOES DURING FOLLICULAR DEVELOPMENT*.Indian Journal Of Animal Research.2007.(41):87 - 93
G.P. Kalmath and J.P. Ravindra**
Address : Department of Veterinary Physiology, University of Agricultural Sciences, Hebbal, Bangalore - 560 024, India

Abstract

Mineral profiles (sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium) of ovarian antral follicular
fluid in buffaloes were studied, using ovaries procured from civil slaughterhouse, Bangalore.
Antral follicular fluid aspirated from small (<6 mm), medium (6-10 mm) and large (11-16 mm)
follicles was analyzed for sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium using clinical analyzer
(photometer, BT-224 Biotechnica instruments). While sodium and calcium concentrations increased
with advancement in follicular size, potassium concentration showed a reverse trend. Magnesium
concentration did not show definite trend with respect to the follicle size. There were variations
in the concentrations of different mineral constituents (sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium) during different months with different ambient temperature. It was concluded that the concentration of different mineral constituents significantly differed with size of the follicle and also with respect to the different months of the year.

Keywords

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