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EFFECT OF BEDDING MATERIAL ON PARASITIC PROFILE OF BARBARI GOATS AND MANURE ENRICHMENT OF LITTER UNDER SEMI-INTENSIVE SYSTEM OF REARING

Article Id: ARCC2344 | Page : 100-103
Citation :- EFFECT OF BEDDING MATERIAL ON PARASITIC PROFILE OF BARBARI GOATS AND MANURE ENRICHMENT OF LITTER UNDER SEMI-INTENSIVE SYSTEM OF REARING.Indian Journal of Animal Research.2008.(42):100-103
P. Khare, D.V. Singh, and S.K. Singh
Address : College of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, G.B. Pant University of Agric. & Tech., Pantnagar - 263 145, India

Abstract

Twenty Barbari does, maintained under semi-intensive system of housing, were provided with
different bedding materials (saw dust, chaffed paddy straw, rice husk, slatted wooden, cement
concrete, sand and soil) in winter, summer and rainy season from December 2004 to August 2005
in Tarai region of Uttaranchal to study parasitic load through egg per gram (EPG) count as well as
to ascertain better manure absorption capacity of the litter. Overall EPG values of does in winter,
summer and rainy seasons were 290.6 ± 41.2, 913.13 ± 74.51 and 745.0 ± 57.9 eggs per gram,
respectively. Egg count in winter was significantly lower (P<0.01) than summer and rainy seasons.
During winter, the least-squares means of EPG of does kept on saw dust, paddy straw, rice husk and
wooden slatted bedding materials were 237.5 ± 41.3, 367.5 ± 45.3, 335.00 ± 44.3 and 222.5 ± 46.1
eggs per gram, respectively. During summer, the EPG count of does kept on of wooden slatted
bedding were significantly (P0.01) higher (1340.0 ± 119.2) than those kept on cement concrete,
sand and soil and wooden slatted bedding. During monsoon, the EPG count remained indifferent
due to the bedding materials used. Maximum moisture, nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium were
retained by rice husk (80.42 %), paddy straw (71.48%), saw dust (50.38 %) and rice husk (1.89 %),
respectively. Hence, rice husk may be considered as bedding material of choice for housing goats
in Tarai region of Uttaranchal

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