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EFFECTS OF WATER AND FEED RESTRICTION ON SOME PHYSIOLOGICAL AND HAEMATOLOGICAL PARAMETERS AND BLOOD CONSTITUENTS OF SUDANESE DESERT GOATS FED HIGH AND LOW QUALITY FORAGES UNDER SEMI-ARID CONDITIONS

Article Id: ARCC2328 | Page : 39-43
Citation :- EFFECTS OF WATER AND FEED RESTRICTION ON SOME PHYSIOLOGICAL AND HAEMATOLOGICAL PARAMETERS AND BLOOD CONSTITUENTS OF SUDANESE DESERT GOATS FED HIGH AND LOW QUALITY FORAGES UNDER SEMI-ARID CONDITIONS.Indian Journal of Animal Research.2008.(42):39-43
I.M. Kheir 1* and M.M.M. Ahmed
Address : Institute of Environmental Studies, University of Khartoum, P.O. Box 321, Khartoum-Sudan

Abstract

In an experiment to study water and feed restriction on some physiological and haematological
parameters and blood constituents of Sudanese desert goats, nine male goats were subjected to
three treatments: (a) ad libitum water and feed (control), (b) ad libitum feed and water restricted to
about 40% of the control, and (c) ad libitum water and restricted feed (same amount as given to
group b). The acute effects of the above treatments on these parameters were monitored using two
types of feed (Lucerne or sorghum hay). Rectal temperature (RT) and respiration rate (RR) of goats
increased (P0.01) from orning to afternoon; RT decreased due to feed restriction during morning
and afternoon with lucerne hay (P0.05) and grass hay (P0.05), whreas RR decrased (P<
0.01) with both types of feeds. For all group of animals, RT was higher (P<0.05) with lucerne hay
than with grass hay, this effect being more pronounced (P<0.01) with the control group.
Haematological parameters, Hb and PCV were not affected by water and feed restrictions. Plasma
glucose levels increased significantly (P0.05) with lucerne hay in both water andfeed restricted
groups, while plasma cholesterol increased significantly (P<0.05) with the grass hay in both groups.
Plasma urea concentration significantly (P0.01) increased with feeding lucerne hay ompared to
grass hay. Plasma minerals (Na+, K+ and Ca++) levels were not affected by either water or feed
restrictions or feed types

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  3. Ad libitum
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  87. Values are means of 9 animals ± SE
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  100. 186.59 ± 14.57
  101. 114.50 ± 2.81
  102. 193.84 ± 11.78
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  106. 2.19 ± 0.20
  107. 3.78 ± 0.63
  108. 2.56 ± 0.01
  109. 3.63 ± 0.74
  110. 2.03 ± 0.21
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  114. 14.77 ± 0.36
  115. 12.35 ± 0.97
  116. 11.91 ± 0.98
  117. 8.56 ± 0.49
  118. 13.09 ± 0.64
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