EFFECT OF SEASONAL STRESS ON GROWTH RATE AND SERUM ENZYME LEVELS IN YOUNG CROSSBRED CALVES.

Article Id: ARCC2003 | Page : 288-29
Citation :- EFFECT OF SEASONAL STRESS ON GROWTH RATE AND SERUM ENZYME LEVELS IN YOUNG CROSSBRED CALVES..Indian Journal Of Animal Research.2009.(43):288-29
C.S. Bahga, S.S. Sikka* and S. Saijpal*
Address : Department of Processing and Food Engineering, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana-141 004, India.

Abstract

A study was conducted on 16 crossbred calves during spring (Feb–Mar) and summer (July) on
crossbred calves aged 15 days. Body weights were recorded at fortnightly intervals till 120 days
of age. Approximately 10.0 ml blood was collected from each calf in the mid experimental period
in chilled glass vials kept in ice-salt mixture. Blood sera were analyzed for glucose, serum glutamic
pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), serum glutamic oxaloacetic transminase (SGOT) and alkaline
phosphatase. Growth rate was significantly (P<0.01) depressed in summer (362.12±17.42 gm.
/day) compared to spring (534.12±22.57 gm. /day). Serum glucose was significantly (P<0.05)
lower in summer (38.62±4.81 mg %) than spring (51.69±4.40 mg %). Similarly serum glutamic
pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) activity was lower (P<0.05) in summer (10.68±0.96 U/ml) compared
to spring (16.44±2.17 U/ml). Serum alkaline phosphatase was higher in summer (130.43±14.79
KA Units) compared to spring (119.44±10.81 KA Units), though the differences were nonsignificant
at 5% level. It can be concluded that summer stress reduces growth rate and it may be
due to lower energy generation and impaired metabolism. Lower SGPT activity indicates
lower amino acid turnover while higher alkaline phosphatase activity is an indicator of bone
resorption/alkalosis.

Keywords

P.

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