MAJOR CAUSES OF SLAUGHTERING OF FEMALE CATTLE IN ADDIS ABABA ABATTOIR ENTERPRISE, ETHIOPIA

Article Id: ARCC1621 | Page : 271-274
Citation :- MAJOR CAUSES OF SLAUGHTERING OF FEMALE CATTLE IN ADDIS ABABA ABATTOIR ENTERPRISE, ETHIOPIA.Indian Journal Of Animal Research.2009.(43):271-274
Berihu Gebrekidan, Tefera Yilma and Solmon
Address : Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia.

Abstract

To study the major causes of slaughtering of female cattle in Addis Ababa Abattoir Enterprise,
235 female cattle to be slaughtered were examined for ante and post mortem. Close observation
was given to udder and reproductive organs. Of the total 235 female cattle that came for
slaughtering, the most prevalent reason of culling, accounted for 39.1%, were reproductive
problems of which 36.6% were anoestrus cows and 28% were repeat breeders. The second most
frequently recorded reason, accounted for 32.3% was associated with udder problems followed
by low milk yield, age, lameness and others with the occurrence rate of 5.9%, 11.4%, 3.4% and
8.1%, respectively. From the total female cattle genitalia examined in the slaughter house 31.5%
were found with one or more gross abnormalities of which ovarian abnormalities accounted for
15.3% were the major ones followed by uterine 10.7%, and oviductal and cervico-vaginal
abnormalities 3.4% each. Of the total lesions, ovario-bursal adhesions 8.1%, endometritis 6.4%
and ovaian cyst 5.5% were the first three predominant abnormalities recorded. In the present
study, parity and age of animals showed statistically significant association (P<0.05) with the
occurrence of overall reproductive abnormalities. The current study also revealed that
reproductive tract abnormalities and mastitis had considerable impact on the productive and
reproductive performance of female cattle.

Keywords

Addis Ababa abattoir Female cattle Reproductive disorders.

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