Loading...

A Study on Morphological Growth and Development of Swiss Albino Mice, Wistar Rat and Dunkin Hartley Guinea Pigs

DOI: 10.18805/BKAP371    | Article Id: BKAP371 | Page : 344-346
Citation :- A Study on Morphological Growth and Development of Swiss Albino Mice, Wistar Rat and Dunkin Hartley Guinea Pigs.Bhartiya Krishi Anusandhan Patrika.2021.(36):344-346
K. Abhijeet, Y.B. Rajeshwari, Vivek M. Patil, R.Y. Ranjith, S.M. Ali, G.S. Shaswath, S.K. Bhandekar, Akash Katiyar, K.D. Masood, Prabha Karan dr.abhikumar0501@gmail.com
Address : Central Poultry Development Organization and Training Institute, Hessarghatta, Bangalore-560 088, Karnataka, India.
Submitted Date : 10-09-2021
Accepted Date : 3-12-2021

Abstract

Background: Baseline information on the morphological development of laboratory animals is very scanty. Hence the present study was undertaken to understand the morphological development of experimental animals. 
Methods: An experiment was conducted at Biogen animal facility, Bangalore in the year 2018 to study the morphological changes with regard to growth and developmental parameters in Swiss albino mice and Wistar rats and body weight in guinea pigs. Ten Swiss albino mice and Wistar rats in advanced pregnancy of similar age groups and comparable litter sizes in the previous kindlings were selected for the experiment, where as five guinea pigs males and females each were selected with same age group. During the study period, litter weight and size at birth and at weaning, time of initiation and completion (full growth of hair) of hair growth, time of opening of eyes and ears recorded in Swiss albino mice and Wistar rats whereas body weight at birth, 3rd day, 6th day, 9th day, 12th day and 15th were recorded in Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs. 
Result: The results of Swiss albino mice indicated that the average litter weight (grams) and litter size at birth ranged from 1.39 and 7.50 respectively. The average time taken from initiation and full growth of hair covering on body was 7.50 to 15.30 days. Eyes and ears opened at 7.90 and 8.20 days respectively. Average weight of male and female recorded at weaning (25 days) 19.38 and 15.12 respectively and the litter size at the weaning was 9.70 whereas, livability percent was recorded 87.81 at the end of the trial. The results of Wistar rats indicated that the average litter weight (grams) and litter size at birth ranged from 5.07 and 11 respectively. The average time taken from initiation to full growth of hair covering on body was 9 to 16.20 days. Eyes and ears opened at 12.20 days, average weight (grams) of male and female recorded at weaning (25 days) 78.03 and 63.09 respectively. The litter size at the weaning was 9.70. The livability percent was recorded 88.02 at the end of the trial. The results of Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs indicated that the average body weight (grams) of female at birth, 3rd day, 6th day, 9th day, 12th day, 15th (Weaning period) ranged from 94.88, 109.34, 123.94, 139.74, 152.14 and 166.66, respectively. On the other hand, average body weight (grams) of male at birth, 3rd day, 6th day, 9th day, 12th day, 15th (Weaning period) ranged from 145.38, 155.42, 170.50, 185.54, 200.64 and 215.7, respectively.

Keywords

Dunkin hartley guinea pig Growth pattern Litter size Swiss albino mice Wistar rat

References

  1. Anonymous, (2006). Manual of laboratory animals - John Hopkins University. Accessed at https://web.jhu.edu/animalcare/ procedures/rat.html#general.
  2. Anonymous (2015). Dunkin Hartley Detailed specifications - Janvier- Labs. Accessed at https://www.janvier-labs.com/en/ fiche_produit/dunkin hartley/pdf/.
  3. Anonymous, (2015). WISTAR Rat Detailed specifications - Janvier- Labs. Accessed at https://www.janvier-labs.com/en/fiche_ produit/swiss_mouse/pdf/.
  4. Bacon, S.J. and McClintock, M.K. (1994). Multiple factors determine the sex ratio of postpartum - conceived Norway rat litters. Physiol. Behav. 56(1): 359-366.
  5. Chia, R., Achilli, F., Festing, M.F. and Fisher, E.M. (2005). The origins and uses of mouse outbred stocks. Nat. Genet. 37(11): 1181-1186.
  6. Clause, B.T. (1993). The Wistar rat as a right choice: Establishing mammalian standards and the ideal of a standardized mammal. J. History. Biol. 26(2): 329-349.
  7. Festing, M.F.W. (1993). International Index of Laboratory Animals, 6th edn. Festing, Leicester.
  8. Hau, J. and Van Hoosier, G.L. (2005). Handbook of Laboratory Animal Science: Animal Models, Volume III. Handbook of Laboratory Animal Science: Animal Models, Volume III., (Ed. 2).
  9. Koolhaas, J.M. (2010). The Laboratory Rat. The UFAW Handbook on the Care and Management of Laboratory and other Research Animals. 8(1): 311-26.
  10. Krinke, G., Bunton, T. and Bullock, G. (Eds) (2000). The Laboratory Rat. Academic Press, New York.
  11. Lindsay, J.R. (1979). Historical Foundations. In: The Laboratory Rat, Vol. I, Biol. and Dis. (H.J. Lynch CJ: The so-called Swiss mouse. Lab Anim Care 1969, 19(1): 214-220.
  12. Baker, J.R. Lindsey, S.H. Weisbroth, (1979).  eds.). Academic Press, New York NY: 2-36.
  13. National Research Council (1996). Guide for the Care and use of Laboratory Animals. National Academies Press, Washington, DC.
  14. Parshad, R.K. (1997). Effect of restricted feeding of prepubertal and adult male rats on fertility and sex ratio. Indian J. Exp. Biol. 31(1): 991-992.
  15. Pellis, S.M. and Pellis, V.C. (1998). Play fighting of rats in comparative perspective: A schema for neurobehavioral analyses. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews. 23(1): 87-101.
  16. Rex, A., Kolbasenko, A., Bert, B. (2007). Choosing the right wild type: Behavioral and neurochemical differences between 2 populations of rats from the same source but maintained at different sites. J. Am. Assoc. Lab. Anim. Sci. 46(2): 13-20.
  17. Russell, R.J., Johnson, D.K. and Stunkard, J.A. (1981). A Guide to Diagnosis. Treatment and Husbandry of Pet Rabbits and Rodents. Veterinary Medicine Publishing Co., Edwardsville KY.
  18. Schapiro, S.J. and Everitt, J.I. (2006). Preparation of animals for use in the laboratory: Issues and challenges for the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). ILAR Journal. 47(4): 370-375.
  19. Ward, J.D. (2008). A manual for laboratory animal management World Scientific Publishing Company. (Vol. 5).
  20. Živkoviæe, I., Rajnpreht, I., Miniæ, R., Mitiæ, K., Aleksiæ, I., Kadriæ, J. and Petrušiæ, V. (2016). Characterization of Intor: Swiss albino mice adopted in the Institute of virology, vaccines and sera: Torlak, Belgrade in the early twentieth century. Acta Veterinaria-Beograd. 66(3): 279-293.

Global Footprints