Assessment of Cactus (Opuntia Ficus-indica L. Mill) Accessions for Growth, Yield and Nutritional Parameters under Pot Culture

DOI: 10.18805/ag.D-4920    | Article Id: D-4920 | Page : 139-141
Citation :- Assessment of Cactus (Opuntia Ficus-indica L. Mill) Accessionsfor Growth, Yield and Nutritional Parameters under Pot Culture.Agricultural Science Digest.2019.(39):139-141
Kauthale V K, Punde K K, S D Kodre vitthal.kauthale@baif.org.in
Address : BAIF Development Research Foundation, Pune-411 058, Maharashtra, India.
Submitted Date : 1-04-2019
Accepted Date : 4-05-2019

Abstract

A pot experiment was conducted at BAIF Development Research Foundation, Urulikanchan, Pune, India during 2014-2016 to study the biomass production performance of four cactus accessions as a source of fodder for livestock. Single matured cladodes of individual accessions were planted in plastic pots during August 2014 and were harvested 18 months after planting. The growth and yield observations were recorded during harvesting and fresh cladodes were analyzed for nutritional parameters in the laboratory. The study revealed that the highest green biomass yield per plant was recorded in accession 1270 (1.74 kg) followed by 1271 (1.45 kg), 1280 (1.39 kg) and the lowest was in accession 1308 (1.36 kg). The maximum fresh weight per cladode was observed in accession 1280 (448.84 g) followed by 1270 (436.75 g), 1271 (394.73 g) and the minimum was in accession 1308 (150.69 g). The more number of cladodes (9.0) were found in accession 1308 followed by 1270 (4.0), 1271 (3.69) and the least (3.10) was in accession 1280. The maximum cladodes area of 333.14 cm2 was recorded in accession 1270 followed by 1280 (310.84 cm2) and the lowest was in accession 1308 (95.61 cm2). The nutritional evaluation of fresh cladodes revealed dry matter in the range of 8.24 to 11.15 %, crude protein 4.00 to 6.03% and crude fiber 7.06 to 8.15%. 

Keywords

Biomass yield Cactus accessions Growth Nutritional parameters.

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