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THE BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF WEEDS - A REVIEW

Article Id: ARCC4262 | Page : 279 - 288
Citation :- THE BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF WEEDS - A REVIEW.Agricultural Reviews.2004.(25):279 - 288
Dhiman Mukherjee and R.P. Singh
Address : Department of Agronomy, Institute of Agricultural Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi - 221005, India

Abstract

Biological control of weeds involves the use of living organisms to attack a weed population to keep at or below desirable level without significantly affecting desirable plants. It includes use of insects, pathogens, nematodes, parasitic plants and competiting plants. Historically, biological control method has proved best on large infestation of a single weed species. These situations usually occurred in range lands or in water bodies. Biological control has also been successful into newly introduced weed area freed from its natural enemies. Unfortunately, biological weed control has not developed to the point that it has any appreciable impact on the production of agronomic crops. The more recent and much more successful importation of several pathogens Into several countries have served to increase interest in the classical approach to biological control of weeds to such a point that several countries are now actively pursuing this approach. A large number of biocontrol agents are used in biological weed control measure. Some outstanding examples of blocontrol of weeds are the use of insect to control Hypercium perforatum L., Opuntia sp. and Lantana camera L.

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