Loading...

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPLICATIONS OF SOIL DEGRADATION IN INDIA - A REVIEW

Article Id: ARCC4240 | Page : 57 - 63
Citation :- ENVIRONMENTAL IMPLICATIONS OF SOIL DEGRADATION IN INDIA - A REVIEW.Agricultural Reviews.2004.(25):57 - 63
Jagdish Prasad
Address : National Bureau of Soil SUlVey and Land Use Planning, Amravati Road, Nagpur - 440 010, India

Abstract

Soil is a finite and non-renewable natural resource forms a basic medium of life support for its inhabitants but due to anthropogenic factors or climatic factor there is quantum jump in degradation of various types and intensity (57.1% land area) in India. Even proud achievement through ‘Green Revolution’ has been followed by pain and protest for degrading environmental quality. The alarming rate of degradation is to be corrected/prevented through suitable and tested methodologies so that productivity and quality of both soil and produce can be maintained to feed the swelling population of human and animals or otherwise face the consequence like perished civilizations of past.

References

  1. Bajwa et ai. (1993). Proc. First AgriCultural Science Congress. National Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Indian
  2. . AgriculturalResearch Institute. New Delhi, p.223.
  3. Balpande, S.S. et a! (1996). Land Degradation Develop. 7: 313·324.
  4. Blum, WEJ-t (1988). Problem of Soil Conservation. Nature of Environmental Series No.40, Council of Europe,
  5. Strasbourg.
  6. Chhonkar. PK and Rattan. RK(2000).lndian Fmg.. 49(1): 26-29 & 31.
  7. Gowda, Andani, et a! (1998). Agrp India, 2(1): 6-7.
  8. Gupta, DK (1986). Pesticides in Indian Environment. Inter Print Publishers, New Delhi,
  9. ICMR, (1993). Indian Council of Medical Research. New Delhi. India.
  10. Kanwar, J.S. (1978). In: Soil Fertility - The6ryand Practice. (Kanwar, J.S. ed.), ItAR, New Delhi.
  11. Kanwar, J.S. (2000). In: International Conference on Managing Natural Resources in the 21" Century. Held at New Delhi February 14-18; 2000,.p.4-6.
  12. Kanwar, J.S. and Mehta, KK, (1968). Indiail J. Agric SCI, 38: 881-886.
  13. Lal, R. and Stewart. B.A. led.) (1992). AdVances in Soil Science, ·17. Springer - Verlag, New York.
  14. Mitra, A and Gupta, SK (1999). J Indian Soc Soil Sci. 47: 99-105.
  15. NationalRemote SensingAgency (1985).· Mapping of Wastelands in India from Satellite Imagery 1980-82, Summary
  16. . Report, National Remote Sensmg Agency.
  17. Ray, S,K et a! (2000). In: International Conference on Managing Natural Resources for Sustainable· Agricultural
  18. Production in 21" Century. Held at New Oelhi. India. 2: 385-386.
  19. Sehgal, J.L. and Abrol, I.P. (1994). Soil Degradation in India: Status and Impact. Oxford and IBH Publishing to. Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi. .
  20. Sakal, R. et a! (1992). J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 40: 732-737.
  21. Singh, G.B. (1999). Indian Fmg., 49(7): 47-51 & 53.
  22. Subba Rao, LV. (1999). J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 47: 611-663.
  23. Ve!ayutham, M. etaJ. (1999a). In: Global climate change and tropicalecosystems (Lal, R et aI.) Lewis Publishers, Boca Rattan, florida. pp. 71-96.
  24. Yadav, J.S.P. (2002). J. Indian Soc. Soil Sci., 50: 322-32,5.

Global Footprints