PHYTOREMEDIATION - A REVIEW

Article Id: ARCC4187 | Page : 216 - 222
Citation :- PHYTOREMEDIATION - A REVIEW.Agricultural Reviews.2006.(27):216 - 222
A.V. Ramanjaneyulu and Gajendra Giri
Address : Division of Agronomy, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi - 100 012, India

Abstract

The scope of increasing the area cultivated for forages is rather limited, because of mounting pressure and preferential need for food and commercial crops. Hence fodder production has to be increased per unit area per unit time. Quality of forage is also very important to animal health and performance. Forage quality can be improved and the toxic principles can be alleviated by efficient nutrient management. Keeping these points in view, the literature pertaining to the fertilizer management in different forage crops to obtain higher biomass production and good quality fodder has been reviewed

Keywords

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