INSECTICIDE RESISTANCE MANAGEMENT IN COTTON - INDIAN SCENARIO - A REVIEW

Article Id: ARCC4181 | Page : 157 - 169
Citation :- INSECTICIDE RESISTANCE MANAGEMENT IN COTTON - INDIAN SCENARIO - A REVIEW.Agricultural Reviews.2006.(27):157 - 169
P. Radhika1 and G.V. Subbaratnam
Address : Department of Entomology, Acharya N.G. Ranga Agricultural University, College of Agriculture, Hyderabad - 500 030, A.P., India

Abstract

A large number of citrus species/progenitors of commercial citrus fruits are believed to have originated in India. Availability and wide gene pool in the form of genetic diversity is a prerequisite for crop improvement. Genetic diversity is the extent of genetic variability's among the individual in a single species and between the species. The diversity within a species needs to be preserved for improvement programme. Assessment of genetic vulnerability of any citrus species requires knowledge of the extent and distribution of genetic diversity. However, the number of citrus accessions worldwide are listed to be 6000 and in India 1495 inclusive of wild species, rootstock old cultivars, advanced cultivars, and breeding lines. In India collection and conservation of citrus species/types started long back. However, in mid of nineteen century it received major emphasis. In yesteryears, collection and conservation were primarily made for the quality fruits. While, the current research efforts are addressed to collection of gene pool with distinct desirable traits, which can be utilized for improvement of cultivars. Total 7 citrus species in India are reported as endangered citrus species. They needs special attention for future use.

Keywords

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