LEAF COLOUR CHART FOR NITROGEN MANAGEMENT IN RICE– A REVIEW

Article Id: ARCC2519 | Page : 306 - 310
Citation :- LEAF COLOUR CHART FOR NITROGEN MANAGEMENT IN RICE– A REVIEW.Agricultural Reviews.2008.(29):306 - 310
C. Sudhalakshmi, V. Velu and T.M. Thiyagarajan
Address : Department of Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore- 641 003.

Abstract

Leaf Color Chart (LCC) has substituted chlorophyll meter (SPAD) to estimate the leaf nitrogen (N) status of rice (Oryza sativa L.) and for timely N fertilizer application. It is an inexpensive, simple and easy to use tool with six shades of greenness from light yellow to dark green. LCC readings are taken once in a week, starting from 14 days after transplanting for transplanted rice and 21 days after seeding for wet seeded rice. Readings are taken once every 7 – 20 days until the first flowering. The critical value is 3 for varieties with light green foliage and 4 for all other varieties and hybrids. If the critical value of the leaf falls below the threshold value, 35 kg N/ha during kar/kuruvai/navarai and 30 kg N/ha during samba/thaladi/pishanam season need to be applied. As nitrogen supply matches with the crop demand, there is considerable yield increase under LCC - N management and because of the optimum N supply, there is saving of nitrogenous fertilizers to the tune of 20 – 40 kg/ha

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