BT COTTON HYBRIDS IN INDIA - A REVIEW

Article Id: ARCC2515 | Page : 271 - 280
Citation :- BT COTTON HYBRIDS IN INDIA - A REVIEW.Agricultural Reviews.2008.(29):271 - 280
K. Kalaichelvi, K. Ramamoorthy and A. Arulswaminathan
Address : Department of Spices and Plantation Crops Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore - 641 003, Tamil Nadu, India

Abstract

Cotton ‘White Gold’ is an important commercial crop. The major threat to cotton production is
its higher susceptibility to pests especially bollworms. Globally, the maximum amount of pesticides
was consumed by cotton alone. But nowadays, chemical pesticides miserably failed to check the
menace of bollworms in cotton system. Bollworms have developed resistance to most of the potent
pesticides. To combat this problem, transgenic Bt cotton has been developed which evokes inbuilt
resistance in host and offers protection against bollworms. Application of insecticides in Bt cotton
should be based on scouting and thresholds. Bt endotoxin, the insecticidal crystal cry protein efficiency differs on various factors like varieties, season, crop age, environment and management practices ike amount of nitrogenous fertilizers applied etc. Bt cotton was found to be safer to human and animal kind.

Keywords

References

  1. Adamczyk, J.J. et al. (2001). J. Econ. Entomol., 94: 284-290.
  2. AICCIP. (2002). All India Coordinated Cotton Improvement Project, Annual report, Central Institute for Cotton Research, Nagpur. pp. 44-45.
  3. AICCIP. (2003). All India co-ordinated Cotton Improvement Project, Annual Report, Central Institute for Cotton Research, Regional Station, Coimbatore. pp. 7.
  4. AICCIP. (2004a). All India Coordinated Cotton Improvement Project, Annual report, Central Institute for Cotton Research, Nagpur. pp. A9-A10.
  5. AICCIP. (2004b). All India Co-ordianted Cotton Improvement Project, Annual Report, Central Institute for Cotton Research, Nagpur. pp. 50-68.
  6. AICCIP. (2005a). All India Coordinated Cotton Improvement Project, Annual progress report, Regional station, Coimbatore centre, pp.1-2.
  7. AICCIP. (2005b). All India co-ordinated Crop Improvement Project, Annual Report, Central Institute of Cotton Research, Nagpur, India. pp.30-35.
  8. Ansingkar,A.S. et al . (2005). J. Soils and Crops, 15(2):338-342.
  9. Bachelor, J.S. and Mott. D.W. (1996). In : Proceedings of Beltwide Cotton Conference held during 9-12, January’ 1996 at Nashville TN, USA, pp. 927-931.
  10. Bambawale,O.M. et al. (2004). Curr. Sci., 86(12):1628-1633.
  11. Barwale, R.B. et al. (2004). AgroBioForum, 7:23-26.
  12. Benedict, J. H. et al. (1996). J. Econ. Entomol., 89: 230-238.
  13. Bulla, L.A. et al. (1977). J. Bacteriol., 230:375-383.
  14. Chakrabarti, S.K. et al. (1998). J. Invertebr. Patho., 72:336-337
  15. Cooke F.T. et al. (2000). In:Proc. Beltwide Cotton Conf., National Cotton Council. 1:175-177.
  16. CSM. (2005). Cotton Scientists’ Meet Report, Department of Cotton, Centre for Plant Breeding and Genetics, Tamil Nadu Agric. Univ., Coimbatore.
  17. De Maagd, R.A. et al. (1999). Trends Plant Sci., 4: 9-13.
  18. Dong, H et al. (2004). Curr. Sci., 86(6):778-782.
  19. Ethridge, M.D. and Hequet. E.F. (2000). In: Proc. Beltwide Cotton Conf. National Cotton Council. 1: 488-494.
  20. Fitt, G. P. 2004. In: Proceedings, World Cotton Research Conferences-3, Cape Town, 9-13 March, 2003. Agricultural
  21. Research Council Institute for Industrial Research Crops, Pretoria, Republic of South Africa.
  22. Fitt, G. P. et al. (1998).. In: M.P. Zalucki, R.A.I. Drew and G.G. White (eds), Proceedings, Sixth Austria Applied
  23. Entomological Research Conference, Brisbane, 29 September - 2 October, 1998. Pest management - Future Challenges, vol.1 University of Queensland Printery, Brisbane, Australia. pp.189-196
  24. Fitt,G. P. et al. (1994). Aus. Bio. Sci. Tech., 4: 535-548.
  25. Flint, H.M. et al. (1995). South Western Entomologist, 20(3): 281-92.
  26. Girradi, R.S. et al. (2004). In: Proceedings of International Symposium on “Strategies for sustainable crop production
  27. – A global Vision” on 23-25 Nov, held at University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad, Karnataka (India). pp. 82-84.
  28. Gosh, P.K. (2004). DPM Mitx II , pp.8-26.
  29. Hardee, D.D. et al. (2001). United States Department of Agriculture. pp. 1- 37.
  30. Harris, F.A. et al. (1996). In: Proceedings of Beltwide Cotton Conference, 2: held during 9-12 January, 1996 at Nashville TN. USA. pp. 854-858.
  31. Ishiwata, S. (1901). (Ref. Sericult. Assoc. Jpn.) 9:1-5
  32. Kannan, M. et al. (2004). Curr. Sci., 86(5): 726-730.
  33. Karim, S. et al. (2000).. Pestic.Biochem.Physiol., 67:198-216
  34. Khadi, (2004). In : Annual Group Meeting Report, Mahatma Phule Krishi Vidyapeeth, Ahmedanagar (India), pp. 7-10.
  35. Knowles, B.H. (1994). Adv. Insect Physiol., 24: 275-308.
  36. 280 AGRICUTURAL REVIEWS
  37. Kranthi, K.R. et al. (2005a). Curr.Sci., 88(5):796-800.
  38. Kranthi, K.R. et al. (2005b). Curr.Sci., 89(2):291-297.
  39. Kumar, P.A. et al. (1996). Adv. Appl. Microbiol., 42: 1-46.
  40. Luttrell, R.G. and Nerzog. G.A.(1994). In: Proceedings of Beltwide Cotton Conference, 5-8 January, 1994, at San Diego. Memphis, USA.
  41. Luttrell, R.G. et al. (1999). J. Econ. Entomol., 92: 21-31.
  42. Mayee, C.D. et al. (2004). Indian J. Agric. Sci., 74(1): 46-47.
  43. Men, X.F. et al. (2003). Environ. Entomol., 32(2):270-275.
  44. Mohan, S. (2006). In: Cotton Scientists’ Meet, Dept of cotton, Centre for Plant Breeding and Genetics, TNAU., Coimbatore. pp. CP. 16.
  45. Nehra, P.L. et al. (2004).J. Cotton. Res. Dev., 18(2): 189-190.
  46. Olsen, K.M. et al. (2005). J. Econ. Entomol., 98(3): 1007-1017.
  47. Padidam, M.(1992). J. Invertebr. Pathol., 59:109-11
  48. Perlak, F.J. et al. (2001). The Pt. J., 27: 489-501.
  49. Pyke, B. A., and Fitt. G. O. (1998). In: Proc. Sixth Australian Applied Entomological Research Conference, Brisbane,
  50. 29 September –2 October 1998. Pest Management – Future Challenges, Vol. 1. University of Queensland
  51. Printery, Brisbane, Australia. pp. 230-237.
  52. Sachs, E.S. et al. (1998). Crop Sci., 38:1-11.
  53. Singh, J and Rao. M.R.K. (2002). Annual Report, Central Institute for Cotton Research, Nagpur, pp.44.
  54. The Agri Businessline. (2005). AP farmers plump for Bt cotton. 26th April, 2005, 10:4-5
  55. The Financial Express. (2004). Bt cotton approval under review. p. 4.
  56. The Financial Express. (2005). Transgenic cotton seeds seen as a tool to improve lower yields. 25th October, 2005. p17.
  57. The Hindu Businessline. (2005 b). 20 Bt cotton strains available to farmers for sowing this year. 25th May, 10: 4 –7.
  58. The Hindu Businessline. (2005a). Bt cotton helping farmers earn more: IMRB study. 7th April, 2005, 7:3-7.
  59. The Hindu Businessline. (2005c). Bt crops boost global farm income: study. 13th October, 2005, p.10.
  60. Udikere, S.S. et al. (2003). In: proceedings World Cotton Research Conference-3 (ed. Swanepoel, A.), Agricultural Research Council-IIC, Cape Town, South Africa, pp. 1282-1286.
  61. Wan, P. et al. (2005). J. Econ. Entomol., 98(1): 195-201.
  62. Wu, K. et al. (2000). Acta Phytophy. Sin. 27: 317-321.
  63. Zhang, Y. et al. (2001).. Acta Phytophy. Sin., 28: 1-6.
  64. Zhao, K. et al. (2000). J. Agric. Biotech., 8: 49-52.

Global Footprints