INTERCROPPING OF WHEAT AND MUSTARD- A REVIEW

Article Id: ARCC2502 | Page : 167 - 176
Citation :- INTERCROPPING OF WHEAT AND MUSTARD- A REVIEW.Agricultural Reviews.2008.(29):167 - 176
Rajeev K. Srivastava, Dipak A. Patel, S.N. Saravaiya and P.P. Chaudhari
Address : Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Navsari Agricultural University, Waghai (Dangs), Gujarat-394 730, India

Abstract

Intercropping of wheat and mustard is an age old practice particularly in Northern Indian for sake of yield stability and cater the needs of oil and grains both. Due to change in demand and price scenario of mustard seed and wheat grain, currently intercropping may be boon to produce higher yield per unit area, in turn generate more income under specific set of conditions particularly row ratio as replacement series in wheat and mustard. At present, row intercropping has been proved to produce higher yield advantage over mixed intercropping. If recommended row ratio for specific area is adopted then farmers could utilize applied and available resources more efficiently and effectively on sustainable basis. With variation in row combination, growth and development of both the component crops are also being deviated, which ultimately affects the yield attributes and yield, but at specific combination LER and yield advantage is definitely augmented. Hence, varying recommendation has been made by scientists for different places. The suitable and appropriate row combination is varying from place to place due to change in climate, farming practices and varieties of crops cultivation. The research avenue is adequate with wheat + mustard intercropping in relation to management of irrigation, fertilizer, genotypes and crop geometry. Future research must be emphasized towards studies of crop competition behaviour, growth, development and yield attributes by using advance agro-technique in order to assess thoroughly cause and reason behind high yield advantage

Keywords

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