GENETIC TRANSFORMATION IN ORNAMENTALS- A REVIEW

Article Id: ARCC2095 | Page : 120 - 131
Citation :- GENETIC TRANSFORMATION IN ORNAMENTALS- A REVIEW.Agricultural Reviews.2009.(30):120 - 131
R.Swarnapiria
Address : Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Floriculture Research Station ,Thovalai- 629302, India

Abstract

Since floricultural and ornamental crops are grown for aesthetic purpose and are
non edible there is likely to be less concern in bio safety issues compared to other food
crops. Hence there is considerable potential for developing transgenics in ornamental
crops. Advances in transgenic technology provide new opportunities for manipulation
of the genome. These will have significant impact on expanding and diversifying the
gene pool of crop plants, introducing specific genes and shortening the time required
for the production of new varieties or hybrids. Molecular breeding is beneficial to increase
the production and quality by creating plants with enhanced resistance to diseases,
insects or viruses and increased tolerance to environmental stresses like salinity,
temperature or drought. Through this technique genes for shelf life, flower colour and
architecture may be directly transferred to develop new varieties that are tailor made to
customer preferences. Bioluminescent orchids and blue roses are the significant outcomes
of the genetic transformation studies in ornamentals

Keywords

Genetic transformation Ornamentals.

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