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BRASSICA BASED INTERCROPPING SYSTEMS- A REVIEW

Article Id: ARCC1361 | Page : 253 - 266
Citation :- BRASSICA BASED INTERCROPPING SYSTEMS- A REVIEW.Agricultural Reviews.2010.(31):253 - 266
Rajesh Kumar Singh, H. Kumar and Amitesh Kumar Singh
Address : Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi – 221 005, India.

Abstract

The traditional practice of mixed cropping has gained popularity in recent years in the
form of intercropping with a suitable modification in planting pattern. Intercropping is defined
as growing of two or more dissimilar crops simultaneously on the same piece of land, in a distinct
row arrangement using one crop as a base crop to which rows of an additional component crop
is added. The recommended optimum plant population of the base crop is suitably combined
with appropriate additional plant density of the component crop. Intercropping provides significant
advantages in land use efficiency, crop productivity and monetary returns as a result of effective
use of solar energy and inputs as compared with sole cropping under diverse agroecologial
situations. Selection of crop and agronomic requirement aspect are very important. In principle
component crops should have contrasting maturities to reduce competition for the same resources
at the same time, variable rooting pattern for better utilization of moisture and nutrients from
different soil depths, different plant height/type for efficient use of light. Moreover, the intercrops
should have either synergistic or complementary effect relative to the base crop. Intercropping
of mustard, an important rabi oilseed crop of Northern India, with cereals and pulses is a traditional
practice to realise yield stability as well as to fulfil the needs of oil and grains. In view of change
in global scenario of demand and supply and also prices of oilseeds and food grains, Brassica
based intercropping assumed great significance to generate more income per unit area under
specific set of conditions. If recommended row ratio of mustard with cereals like wheat, barley
and pulses like chickpea, pea, lentil for a specific area is adopted then farmers could utilize
applied and available resources more efficiently and effectively on sustainable basis. These row
ratio combinations with variation in, growth and development of both the component crops are
also being deviated, which ultimately affects the yield attributes and yield, but at specific
combination land equivalent ratio and yield advantage is definitely augmented. The suitable and
appropriate row ratios combination varies from place to place due to change in climate, farming
practices and varieties of crops cultivation. The research avenue is adequate with mustard +
cereals and pulses intercropping in relation to management of irrigation, fertilizer, genotypes
and crop geometry. Intercropped oilseeds and pulses crop may have the potential for a more
efficient use of resources compared to sole crop. Intercrops are considered as less susceptible to
pests and diseases and may inhibit weeds more efficiently resulting in enhanced yields and
profitability.

Keywords

Oilseed Brassica Rapeseed-Mustard Intercropping Yield Economics.

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