Agricultural Science Digest
Publish
your articles with us

Quick Facts



Payment Options

payment portals

Click here to pay directly

Impact of integrated nutrient management on growth, flowering, yield and economics of tuberose

K. Dhanumjaya Rao*, P. Lalitha Kameswari and T. Baby Rani
Floricultural Research Station, Agricultural Research Institute, Dr. Y.S.R. Horticultural University, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad–500 030, India.
danu40138@yahoo.com

Page Range:
66-69
Article ID:
D-4104
Online Published:
Abstract
An experiment was conducted for three consecutive years during rabi from 2010-11 to 2012-13 at Floricultural Research Station, Hyderabad to study the influence of integrated nutrient management practices to improve the growth and flower yield of Tuberose cv. Hyderabad Double. The treatments consist of combination of organic fertilizers and bio inoculants along with different levels of NPK (100%, 75% and 50%RDF). Compared to 100 % RDF with FYM alone, application of 75% RDF in integration with farm yard manure (FYM), vermicompos (VC), Azospirillum (AZO) and phosphate solubilizing bacteria(PSB) (T4) has significantly yielded maximum number of spikes per plant (2.33) with increased spike length, rachis length, number of florets per spike and also maximum number of bulbs per plant (32.60). B: C ratio ranged between 2.09 - 2.60 with its maximum exhibited by 75% RDF with FYM, VC, AZO and PSB(T4) followed by 50 % RDF with FYM, VC, AZO and PSB (T7).
Keywords
Azospirillum, B:C ratio, Biofertilizer, INM, Phospho bacteria, Tuberose, Vermicompost.
References
  1. Begum, H (1998) Response of tomato crop in Azotobacter inoculation South Indian Horticulture 46(1&2) 88-89.
  2. Gaur, A C (2006) Biofertilizers in Sustainable Agriculture. Directorate of Information and Publication of Agriculture, Indian council of Agriculture Research, New Delhi, p.283
  3. Gayathri, H N Jayaprasad and Narayanaswamy, P (2004) Response of biofertilizers and their combined application with different levels of inorganic fertilizers in statice. Journal of Ornamental Horticulture 7(1): 70-74.
  4. Geeta Pandey, Santhosh Kumar and Ajit Kumar ( 2010) Effect of INM on growth and flowering of Chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora. Tzvelev). Journal of Ornamental Horticulture 13(2): 112-116.
  5. Gupta, R D Jha, K.K and Dev, S P (1983) Effect of fertilizers and organic manures on the microflora and microbiological process in soils. Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences 53(4): 266-270.
  6. Rani Perumal, H F Duriasam, P Kandasamy and palaniappan S P (1991) Integrated Nnutrient Techniques. bulletin published by Tamil Nadu Agricultural university, Coimbatore-India.
  7. Reddy, B P and Swamy, S N (2000) Effect of FYM, Phosphate solubilizing bacteria and phosphorus on yield and economics of black gram. Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences 70 (10):694-696.
  8. Singh, A K (2006) Tuberose. Flower crops- Cultivation and Management: New India Publication Agency New Delhi pp 357-370.
  9. Sinha, R.K. Herat, S. Valani D and Chauhan K. (2009). Earthworms Vermicompost: A powerful crop nutrient over the conventional compost & protective soil conditioner against the destructive chemical fertilizers for food safety and security. American Eurasian Journal of Agricultural & Environmental Science 5(S): 01-55.
  10. Swaminathan V, Ramaswamy N and Pillai O A A (1999) Effect of azospirillum, phosphobacteria and inorganic nutrients on the growth and yield of tuberose. South Indian Horticulture 47 (1-6): 331-334.
  11. Wange, S S Patil, P L and Patil, J J (1995) Effects of biofertilizers alone and with nitrogen levels on tuberose cv. Single petalled Journal of Soils and Crops 5(2): 97-99.
  12. Waheeduzzama, mohd. Jawaharlal, M Arulmozhiyan, R and Indumathi, K (2006) Effect in INM practices on flower quality and vase life of Anthurium andreanum cv. Merngue Journal of Ornamental Horticulture 9(2):142.
Global footprints


© 2015 ARCC JOURNALS. All Rights Reserved. Powered By ARCC JOURNALS